Thursday 24 Jul
 
 

Planting the seed

Chelsey Cope’s new band, Elms, is as earthy and native to Oklahoma as the trees that are their namesake. The soulful folk four-piece’s debut EP, Parallel Lines, was recorded at Bell Labs Recording Studio in Norman and is on its way in September. But the band has already given us a tease, with its first single, “Burn,” going live on SoundCloud on July 14.
07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Commercial rock

Center of the Universe Festival featuring Capital Cities, Young The Giant, AWOLNATION & more
Friday-Saturday
Downtown Tulsa 
centeroftheuniversefestival.com 
$35-$50 

07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Mack truckin’

Swizzymack
9 p.m. Friday 
Kamp’s Lounge 
1310 NW 25th St. 
lndrnrs.com 
819-6004 
$10-$15 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Chevy cruisin’

Chevy Woods with Kevin Gates & more
9 p.m. Sunday 
Vibe Night Club 
227 SW 25th St. 
$20-$40 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Rock steady

Tesla
7 p.m. Saturday
Frontier City
11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road 
frontiercity.com
478-2140
Free with park admission 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Country · Jack Rowdy - Jack Rowdy
Country
 

Jack Rowdy - Jack Rowdy


Stephen Carradini January 12th, 2011

Jack Rowdy’s self-titled album features a diverse array of subgenres within modern country.

With red dirt, pop, ballads, gospel and hot country all receiving attention, it’s easy to see that Jack Rowdy (an Oklahoma City band, not a man) has studied up.

Far from being a radio pastiche, Jack Rowdy infuses each of its tunes with enough muscle from the self-stated “classic rock and ’80s hair metal” influences to set the act apart from the pack.

Not that this is outlaw country; Jack Rowdy doesn’t stray far from timeworn themes of whiskey, women and regrets. But by often employing a rock-inspired, distorted-guitar tone (“Hot Little Cowgirl” excepted), it skips many of the clichés associated with modern country. The vocals also stand out for their clarity and agreeableness — no whiny yelps here.

Highlights include the stellar lyrics and melody of pop song “I Can Love You” and up-tempo rocker “Better Love Someday.” And as hot country songs go, “Hot Little Cowgirl” ain’t no slouch, as it has a solid melody and doesn’t insert any grandiose, overblown touches.

Jack Rowdy’s debut is still strongly a country album; those opposed to modern country as a whole need not apply. But those pining for some tunes with a little more power than Rascal Flatts or Toby Keith will find much to love.

—Stephen Carradini

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close