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IndianGiver - Understudies

There’s a difference between being derivative and being inspired by something, a line a lot of artists can’t seem to find — or at least don’t care to.
04/22/2014 | Comments 0

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0
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Spectral sounds


Although named after something optical, Young Prisms aim to bring pop audiences something aural. Listen up, Roy G. Biv!

Joshua Boydston January 18th, 2011

What we were referring to was general pre-writing, pre-recording, pre-show rock ’n’ roll rituals — you know, smoking weed, basically,” bassist Gio Betteo said, laughing. “Nothing spiritual beyond that. People ran with it like we were trying to connect with the spirit of Jerry Garcia or something."

Young Prisms with Melted Toys and The Copperheads
9 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 26 Opolis

113 N. Crawford, Norman

www.opolis.org

820-0951 $8

Young Prisms is a suitably fresh band from San Francisco with a reputation for spiritual rituals and mystical séances fueling its music. Turns out, new bands are just as susceptible to urban legends as experienced ones.

“That got taken a little too literally. What we were referring to was general pre-writing, pre-recording, pre-show rock ’n’ roll rituals — you know, smok ing weed, basically,” bassist Gio Betteo said, laughing. “Nothing spiritual beyond that. People ran with it like we were trying to connect with the spirit of Jerry Garcia or something.”

The group’s love of ganja fits snuggly with its demeanor. Playing Wednesday, Jan. 26, at Opolis is Norman, the act is comprised of four guys and one gal who are intelligent and capable, if not disinterested and unmotivated — shoegazers with little desire to pick their heads up for much of anything.

Before committing full-time to Young Prisms, they spent the bulk of their time trudging through school or twiddling their fingers at menial jobs, but the music they enjoy playing so much — a mix of noise rock and dream pop — proved to be the thing worth working toward.

“I was working at a wine and cheese shop in the Castro, the absolute gayest part of America,” Betteo said, laughing again. “I was trying to do school, too, but it wasn’t my thing. We were all just sort of passing the time with little things. Now we’ve got something big to focus on.”

A desire to push past San Francisco led them to a shared living space to write, rehearse and record what would become their proper debut album, “Friends for Now,” released yesterday. 2011 is shaping up to be Young Prisms’ year, and Betteo credits the move-in as the main catalyst.

“It became a lot more comfortable to work together,” he said.

Much of the songs on “Friends” have been done for quite some time now, and that layover has left the quintet with plenty of time to write much of what will become its sophomore effort, although its full attention is now on touring to the first one and and spread the Prisms’ name across the country.

Although its members continue to make their first real treks away from the City by the Bay, the band still takes a little piece of the town with it everywhere it goes, with a sound that is undeniably fitting for the place it was born from (San Francisco, not druginduced spirit quests).

“The feeling of the city is definitely present in our music — the fogginess and the darkness that rolls in — but it’s still California, and there are still beaches and it’s sunny. That comes out as well,” Betteo said. “It’s kind of weird. It’s light and dark, just like San Francisco tends to be.”

 
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