Tuesday 22 Jul
 
 

Manmade Objects - Monuments

No one wants to be forgotten; everyone wants some sort of legacy, a mark they leave behind as they exit this life for whatever lies beyond.

And for as long as there has been death, there have been monuments — whether austere or understated, abstract or concrete, prominent or tucked away in private — erected by the ones they loved to assure that remembrance, at least for a time.
07/15/2014 | Comments 0

Admirals - Amidst the Blue

Sometimes it helps to not be very good.

Some of the best albums and artists were born out of happy accidents owed to varying degrees of early suckage — the perfect note or chord for a song found by missing the one you are aiming for, failed mimicry of an idol bearing something entirely new and great instead.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0

Kierston White - Don't Write Love Songs

The Tequila Songbirds have become just as beloved as about any group around these parts. And how could they not?

Featuring a revolving cast of the Sooner State’s most badass female performers, it’s a power hour of some of the best songwriting coming out of central Oklahoma. Sure, they might not technically be family, but they are clearly a band of sisters all the same, bonded by the same brand of whiskey running through their veins.

07/01/2014 | Comments 0

Depth & Current - Dysrhythmia

"Overproduced" is a term thrown around all too indiscreetly nowadays, usually applied when the thing that sticks out about a song or album is how it sounds rather than how it is constructed. Yet some of the most compelling albums ever crafted embodied a certain aesthetic that was just as skillfully and meticulously put together as any Bob Dylan or Miles Davis record — which is to say production is as crucial to our enjoyment of music as much as anything else; it's also the most overlooked.
06/24/2014 | Comments 0

Weak Knees - “IceBevo”

Indie rock has been in a good place as of late. Not caring about being cool is the new cool, and a couple of dudes on guitar, bass and drums can make catchy, earworm songs without being armed to the gills with computer software and vintage synthesizers.
06/17/2014 | Comments 0
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The fifth element


How does Norman-based jamtronica quartet Montu brighten up its already shiny live shows? With lights and lasers. Pew-pew-pew!

Joshua Boydston January 18th, 2011

It’s all about creating something to remember — in every sense of the word — for the four-piece that started as a modest jam session between Godsy and keyboardist John Barkley on a single amplifier. A drummer in Colby Cowart followed before Russell came aboard, and it’s been a big party ever since.

Montu with DJ Kilter
9 p.m. Saturday
Kamp’s Deli & Market
1310 N.W. 25th
819-6004
$5


When Norman’s Montu started to mull over who to bring in to jam with the band next, they opted for a visual approach, rather than aural, and radiation proved to be just as capable as resonance.

“One of the first purchases we made as a band were these five LED light tubes,” said bassist Jon Godsy. “It’s turned out to be a really great purchase.”

Said guitarist Zane Russell, “It’s like a fifth man, another element to jam with the band. With a live show, it’s as much an experience as it is anything else. If the lights are working with the music, it just intensifies the whole encounter.”

Just has the band’s visibility has grown in the Oklahoma music landscape, so has its light show, which has seriously ramped up since a good friend decided to run lights for the act, bringing in more sophisticated equipment, scanners and lasers.

It’s all about creating something to remember — in every sense of the word — for the four-piece that started as a modest jam session between Godsy and keyboardist John Barkley on a single amplifier. A drummer in Colby Cowart followed before Russell came aboard, and it’s been a big party ever since.

“It’s jamtronica, for people who know what that is,” Russell said. “Hippie dance music, for people who don’t.”

Montu has garnered a strong following in both the jam scene and electronic circles, and that, in turn, has done wonders for the genre-benders.

Being relatively unrivaled locally in the subgenre has afforded the group quite a few major opportunities, despite only being active sense 2008. In their short time together, the guys opened for many of their heroes, including everyone’s favorite mash-up DJ.

“Girl Talk was just insane,” Barkley said, “but I think Disco Biscuits was a little more fun for us. It was a good mix of their fans and our fans, instead of just a sold-out show with drunk 16-year-old girls."

Said Godsy, “Playing with those big bands makes things feel a little more attainable. I can see it better; it feels closer.”

As much as they enjoy the big shows, their own headlining gigs are more fun. Those shows have always been smaller — functioning as an obligation for their pals, mostly — but more and more, the band finds itself playing for both new and familiar faces.

“We had a crowd that was mostly our friends,” Cowart said, “but now it’s people coming out for the music, and that’s a great thing to see.”

Montu now finds itself on the verge of a trek to California, in addition to playing many more shows locally (like Saturday’s appearance at Kamp’s Deli & Market) and pursuing the possibilities of releasing more recorded material — namely live albums — although albums only paint half the picture that the band hopes you will come see in person.

“This kind of music is so aimed at a live performance, it’s certainly not something you listen to if you’ve just broken up with your girlfriend,” Russell said. “It’s getting your buddies together and going to have a good time. If you want to see it, you’ve got to see it. It’s something you aren’t going to get from a CD. Every show is improv, every show is unique, and you’ll never see the same show ever again.”

 
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