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Bringing it back again

Carol Smaglinski April 6th, 2011

In the middle of its celebration of 50 years in business, Tulsa-based Mazzio’s Italian Eatery re-introduced Ken’s Original Thin and Crispy pizza for a few months, taking its loyal customers back to where it all stated.

“The original spicy sauce and crispy crust makes it an all-time favorite, and we knew we had to make it part of our 50th celebration,” said Greg Lippert, president and CEO of Mazzio’s.

Mazzio’s now has 166 locations in 10 states. For more information, visit www.mazzios.com.

FIRST WATCH OPENS

First Watch, a breakfast, brunch and lunch spot headquartered in Bradenton, Fla., recently opened its first Oklahoma location in the Quail Springs Marketplace, 2328 W. Memorial.

Like the name suggests, First Watch opens at the crack of dawn, with free newspaper and Internet. It is open seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Neat things are going on, such as no charge for substituting cholesterolfree eggs or egg whites. Customers have the choice to share food at no extra charge and get a pot of freshly brewed Sunrise Select coffee. And you won’t find a heat lamp or a deep-fat fryer in the place — the stuff here is fresh.

Dabbour Enterprises has committed to open three First Watch restaurants in the Oklahoma City market over the next three years. The chain now has more than 80 restaurants in 11 states.

CHOW CHAT

Philippe Garmy is the educational chair for the upcoming Wine Forum of Oklahoma held at Oklahoma State University. He is a clinical professor of hotel and restaurant administration and attended the Universite de Paris, La Sorbonne in Paris.

Best feature? “I am a professed gastronaut.”

Favorite cut of meat? “Cheeks, pork or halibut, and I am very keen on anything cooked over fire — simplicity at its best.”

A famous person you look kinda like: “Bill Murray, but people tell me I am much better looking.”

Quick tip for amateur cooks: “Taste everything every step of the way, have a set of sharp knives, and only use the finest and freshest ingredients.”

A favorite thing to do that doesn’t cost money? “It’s great to get in a convertible with my Marla (Wynn Cooper) and head west.”

Greatest extravagance: “The bubbles (Champagne) I like to pour in my glass.”

One thing people don’t know about you? “I speak five languages, and I actually believe there is a God. I am a Christian.”

What culinary luminary would you love to meet? “I would have to go back to the past because I really believe in the sanctity of the table, breaking bread together and drinking wine.”

Favorite kitchen gadget? “My mortar and pestle (for garlic) and my knives, and I have every kind you can think of.”

A wild happening: “The neighbor lost his rabbit and came knocking on the door looking for it. Little did he know that the rabbit was dinner the previous night. The rabbit was way too fat, and it was a moment of truth or dare by my compadres. So, I lied to him.”

BYTES

If you received horrible service, but excellent food at a restaurant, would you go back? And how many people would you tell about the experience? That was the question we asked last week on Oklahoma Gazette’s Facebook page. Here are your answers, verbatim.

“If it happened one time, I might go back later. If it happened again, I would probably not go back. Depending how horrible it was, I’m at least telling a few friends.” — Michael Shoopman

“If the food is great, I always go back.” —Kristi Robertson

“I would give the restaurant another try however if the second time around was the same as the first. I wouldn’t go back.” —Gina Young

“If the food was excellent, I would prob call the owner and let him/her know that the service was not so great. Sometimes, they need a heads up so they can rectify the situation. If it continued - then no more. And I would prob tell alot of people.” —Vicki Banta

“People have bad days. I would.” —Natalie Curtis

“As a local bartender and server, I just want to point out that horrible service can also be the fault of the patron. For example, wait staff have memories like elephants. So, if you don’t tip you can rest assured that your service will be shitty next time. People who show up ten minutes before closing also suck. Most people are GREAT at dining out and I enjoy my job. Some others need some real help. Dining out is a two way street people and it takes both staff and guest to ensure a good time is had by all.” —Justin Charboneau

—Carol Smaglinski

 
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