Wednesday 09 Jul
 
 

Next big thing

As far as songs go, few prove as challenging to sing as our national anthem.

It’s a technically demanding tune from first note to last, to be sure, beginning with a low bellow that quickly soars toward star-punching high notes, eventually swelling to a show-stopping crescendo that even the most seasoned performer can have trouble mastering.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0

Sheriff Woody

Woody Guthrie Folk Festival featuring Jimmy LaFave, Arlo Guthrie and more

Wednesday through Sunday

Okemah

woodyguthrie.com

Free

07/09/2014 | Comments 0

California dreamin’

Modern Pantheist with The Wurly Birds and Larry Chin

9 p.m. Sunday

Blue Note Lounge 

2408 N. Robinson Ave.

thebluenotelounge.com

600-1166

$5

07/02/2014 | Comments 0

Major League tunes

Chipper Jones with The Hitt Boyz, Foxburrows and Milk Jr

8 p.m. Saturday

VZD’s Restaurant & Club

4200 N. Western Ave.

vzds.com

524-4200

07/02/2014 | Comments 0

Neon colors

Utah-based rockers Neon Trees spent a hot summer night setting fire to Tulsa’s legendary Cain’s Ballroom on June 19. Rounding out the aural palette were Smallpools, a lively L.A. powerhouse, and Nightmare and the Cat, a cadre of black-clad Brit/American alt-rockers. Neon Trees’ latest record, Pop Psychology, was the night’s flux capacitor, transporting all who were willing to a neon-soaked parallel universe.
06/25/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Folk · Emily Arin — Patch of Land
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Emily Arin — Patch of Land


Baffling, awe-inspiring and calming all at once

Stephen Carradini April 5th, 2011

Many artists do what they do within a framework that’s easily named: pop, folk, country, metal, etc.

emilyarin

But Emily Arin’s “Patch of Land” bursts through those categories and creates a mesmerizing album that can’t be pinned down.

Her instrument is the acoustic guitar, and she sings in a haunting tone that falls just south of soprano. Her songs incorporate modern singer/songwriter, folk, ‘50s pop, country, waltzes and more. The whole album is approached with a crisp, clear-eyed production, which makes each element of the sparse arrangements stand out. It’s very, very clear what she’s playing; it’s just not really clear what genre she’s playing.

It really doesn’t matter once you hear it, however. From the wistful opener “Say” to the uniquely tender “Sweetly Breathe” to the stark beauty of closer “Lyle’s Light,” there’s not a bad tune in the mix. Arin will hook you immediately, but it may take a while to figure out what it is that has drawn you. Even if it takes several listens to wrap your head around the songs, her charms are inescapable. You will be baffled, awed and calmed all at once.  —Stephen Carradini

 
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