Thursday 31 Jul
 
 

Sobering sounds

Copperheads with Depth & Current, Dudes of America and Oblivious

10 p.m. Saturday

Opolis

113 N. Crawford Ave., Norman

opolis.org

447-3417

$7

07/30/2014 | Comments 0

Pony expression

Wild Ponies

8 p.m. Sunday

The Blue Door

2805 N. McKinley Ave.

bluedoorokc.com

524-0738

$15

07/30/2014 | Comments 0

Music Made Me: Josh Hogsett

Few, if any, Oklahoma bands have seen a rise as meteoric as Tallows over the past year, yet its seemingly overnight ascension didn’t happen by chance. The Oklahoma City four-piece is well-versed in the ways of modern pop songwriting, drawing from both glitchy electronica and cathartic indie rock in equal measure. Last year, the band pulled off a rare musical feat with its debut album, Memory Marrow, which was steeped heavily in the breadth of recent history yet managed to sound like nothing else before it.
07/30/2014 | Comments 0

Planting the seed

Chelsey Cope’s new band, Elms, is as earthy and native to Oklahoma as the trees that are their namesake. The soulful folk four-piece’s debut EP, Parallel Lines, was recorded at Bell Labs Recording Studio in Norman and is on its way in September. But the band has already given us a tease, with its first single, “Burn,” going live on SoundCloud on July 14.
07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Commercial rock

Center of the Universe Festival featuring Capital Cities, Young The Giant, AWOLNATION & more
Friday-Saturday
Downtown Tulsa 
centeroftheuniversefestival.com 
$35-$50 

07/22/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Jazz · Always Be Happy, but Stay Evil...
Jazz
 

Always Be Happy, but Stay Evil — Garage a Trois


A really jazzy post-rock outfit

Stephen Carradini April 18th, 2011

“Always Be Happy, but Stay Evil” by Garage A Trois creates entries in “best album name” and “best band name” contests for 2011.

alwaysbehappybutstayevil-cvr

I’m not going to lie: About half the reason I wanted to hear this was because of its fantastical name.

I’ve been getting into Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey’s post-everything jazz mash-ups recently, and Garage A Trois is one step further down the rung toward true jazz. Garage A Trois is described as a “post rock/freak jazz supergroup,” and that’s something I can get into!

With saxophone, vibraphone, keys and drums, it looks like a relatively normal jazz quartet, but it’s super-not. The sax and the keys turn in nearly as dissonant turns as an electric guitar in places, and the post-rock tag is no joke. They can really pound it out when they want to (“Resentment Incubator,” “Assault on Precinct 13”). “Kansas” calls up mild Colin Stetson comparisons, and Stetson’s latest is still my frontrunner for album of the year.

Weirdness abounds as well, as in the camp-horror of “Swellage” and space-shots “Shooting Breaks” and “Thumb.” “Baby Mama Drama,” on the other hand, is both a contender for best song title of the year and a straightforward jazz composition.

Garage A Trois is exactly what they were touted to be: a really jazzy post-rock outfit. I enjoyed the latter more than the former, but the former isn’t bad at all. “Always Be Happy” is an intriguing release with some great tunes from several very talented musicians. If you like JFJO, progressive jazz or pushing your boundaries, I dare you to give this one a try. —Stephen Carradini

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close