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Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0

Rachel Brashear — Revolution

Rachel Brashear’s second EP, Revolution, starts with a kick to the shins.
03/18/2014 | Comments 0
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American Indian tries to save dying language through music


Bryan Mangieri November 1st, 2007

Rock 'n' roll just might save a language that is in danger of dying out. The man that made this part of his mission is American Indian recording artist and Grammy winner Robert Mirabal. "In the Bloo...

mirabal

Rock 'n' roll just might save a language that is in danger of dying out. The man that made this part of his mission is American Indian recording artist and Grammy winner Robert Mirabal.

"In the Blood," his 12th release, features songs in English as well as Tiwa, the indigenous language of Mirabal and his ancestors of the Taos Pueblo in New Mexico. Mirabal explained that while 2,000 Taos Pueblo remain, only half speaks the language.

The difficulty of passing the language on to the next generation is made harder because Tiwa is a completely oral language and not a written one. The fragile language, if not taken care of, it could disappear in one age group.

CHALLENGES
Mirabal said the task of saving Tiwa is not as simple as recording the language for generations to come, because there are nuances to the language, such as gestures and innuendos, which don't have sounds to record. He compared using conversational Tiwa in his music to teaching algebra to a student before he or she could learn physics.

"There are different levels to the language," he said. "It's a very poetic language; it paints pictures."

The responsibility of passing the language down lies on the shoulders of those who still speak it, he said. By setting Tiwa to rhythm and melody, Mirabal wants to help preserve his culture and help create an easier way to learn Tiwa. "Bryan Mangieri

 
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