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TJ Mayes - "When Love Comes Down"

’50s era rock ’n’ roll had been long overdue for a rebirth. Thankfully, the stockpile of capable luminaries has not been in short supply over the past few years. 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Boare - "playdatshit"

The world is in the midst of an electronic music renaissance, and you find most of this boon of producers laying claim to the club-friendly, bass-dropping variety, holing up in the the free-flowing world of hip-hop beatmaking or pitching their tent on the out-there, boundary-pushing EDM camp.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Broncho - "Class Historian"

Broncho has never been hurting in the hook department. The success of the trio’s 2011 debut, Can’t Get Past the Lips, was predicated mostly on its ability to marry melodies with kinetic guitar riffs and anarchic energy. Yet we’ve heard nothing to the degree of pure pop catchiness on display in “Class Historian,” the new single from Broncho’s upcoming sophomore album, Just Enough Hip to Be Woman.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Manmade Objects - Monuments

No one wants to be forgotten; everyone wants some sort of legacy, a mark they leave behind as they exit this life for whatever lies beyond.

And for as long as there has been death, there have been monuments — whether austere or understated, abstract or concrete, prominent or tucked away in private — erected by the ones they loved to assure that remembrance, at least for a time.
07/15/2014 | Comments 0

Admirals - Amidst the Blue

Sometimes it helps to not be very good.

Some of the best albums and artists were born out of happy accidents owed to varying degrees of early suckage — the perfect note or chord for a song found by missing the one you are aiming for, failed mimicry of an idol bearing something entirely new and great instead.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0
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American Indian tries to save dying language through music


Bryan Mangieri November 1st, 2007

Rock 'n' roll just might save a language that is in danger of dying out. The man that made this part of his mission is American Indian recording artist and Grammy winner Robert Mirabal. "In the Bloo...

mirabal

Rock 'n' roll just might save a language that is in danger of dying out. The man that made this part of his mission is American Indian recording artist and Grammy winner Robert Mirabal.

"In the Blood," his 12th release, features songs in English as well as Tiwa, the indigenous language of Mirabal and his ancestors of the Taos Pueblo in New Mexico. Mirabal explained that while 2,000 Taos Pueblo remain, only half speaks the language.

The difficulty of passing the language on to the next generation is made harder because Tiwa is a completely oral language and not a written one. The fragile language, if not taken care of, it could disappear in one age group.

CHALLENGES
Mirabal said the task of saving Tiwa is not as simple as recording the language for generations to come, because there are nuances to the language, such as gestures and innuendos, which don't have sounds to record. He compared using conversational Tiwa in his music to teaching algebra to a student before he or she could learn physics.

"There are different levels to the language," he said. "It's a very poetic language; it paints pictures."

The responsibility of passing the language down lies on the shoulders of those who still speak it, he said. By setting Tiwa to rhythm and melody, Mirabal wants to help preserve his culture and help create an easier way to learn Tiwa. "Bryan Mangieri

 
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