Saturday 19 Apr
 
 

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0

Rachel Brashear — Revolution

Rachel Brashear’s second EP, Revolution, starts with a kick to the shins.
03/18/2014 | Comments 0
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Music
 

Tower of cower


Of the Tower, the metro’s most adventurous post-punk act, builds a show aimed to blow minds and alienate the weak at heart.

Charles Martin October 19th, 2011

Of The Tower with Kill The Reflection and The Secret Post
8 p.m. Saturday
VZD’S Restaurant & Club
4200 N. Western
vzds.com
524-4203
$5

Crowds swelled at the OKC Farmers Public Market, waiting to enter the 2010 Carnality Ball when a handful of Bible-thumping protesters with bullhorns set up shop across the street. Hellfire-and-brimstone Scripture was volleyed at scantily clad women and drag queens, but members of the avant-garde band Of the Tower stormed out in costume, banging drums and shouting back with a bullhorn they’d borrowed.

After an hour of having their evangelizing answered with improvised poetry and music, the protest ended, leaving the revelers to their “sin.”

“It came out of thin air so quickly because we had a natural tendency to do those things, to pull public pranks,” said drummer Todd Plunkett. “That was the point that solidified what we wanted Of  the Tower to become: a kind of spontaneous, improvisational, performance-artist band. That was more fulfilling for us than the show we did.”

In the year and a half since, Of the Tower has explored evocative and shocking performance art to enhance its music’s impact. Front man David Goad decided it was time to take the concept to its full potential for Saturday’s “Halloween spectacle” at VZD’s.

If we play for 50 people, 48 scratch their heads.
—Todd Plunkett


“I want the catharsis of the music represented by the expression and the choreography,” said Goad of his fourth-wall-breaking plans. “It’s right there in front of you rather than just a band onstage. There’s a mixture of fear and anticipation that I’d like to instill in the audience.”

He admitted a danger of alienating audience members, but felt it was time to distinguish Of the Tower as not just another dark-wave act.

“We’ve even talked about doing things that are more happenings,” Plunkett said, mentioning a junkyard show that might include “blowing up a car or something. Things like that are never going to get you on MTV, and if we play for 50 people, we might have 48 scratching their heads. But then there are those two people coming out of the audience to tell us they were waiting for this forever.”

Although the group may appeal to a niche market, Goad said it’s important for people to see someone in town doing this sort of thing.

“In Oklahoma, people get stuck in this routine,” he said. “They do their 9-to-5, they come home and have kids, go to LifeChurch and get bored. They start experimenting with what’s around them, whether drugs or swinging. There is not a lot here that speaks to that despair ... but it’s an important part of Oklahoma culture.”

Photo by Doug Schwarz

 
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