Tuesday 22 Jul
 
 

Manmade Objects - Monuments

No one wants to be forgotten; everyone wants some sort of legacy, a mark they leave behind as they exit this life for whatever lies beyond.

And for as long as there has been death, there have been monuments — whether austere or understated, abstract or concrete, prominent or tucked away in private — erected by the ones they loved to assure that remembrance, at least for a time.
07/15/2014 | Comments 0

Admirals - Amidst the Blue

Sometimes it helps to not be very good.

Some of the best albums and artists were born out of happy accidents owed to varying degrees of early suckage — the perfect note or chord for a song found by missing the one you are aiming for, failed mimicry of an idol bearing something entirely new and great instead.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0

Kierston White - Don't Write Love Songs

The Tequila Songbirds have become just as beloved as about any group around these parts. And how could they not?

Featuring a revolving cast of the Sooner State’s most badass female performers, it’s a power hour of some of the best songwriting coming out of central Oklahoma. Sure, they might not technically be family, but they are clearly a band of sisters all the same, bonded by the same brand of whiskey running through their veins.

07/01/2014 | Comments 0

Depth & Current - Dysrhythmia

"Overproduced" is a term thrown around all too indiscreetly nowadays, usually applied when the thing that sticks out about a song or album is how it sounds rather than how it is constructed. Yet some of the most compelling albums ever crafted embodied a certain aesthetic that was just as skillfully and meticulously put together as any Bob Dylan or Miles Davis record — which is to say production is as crucial to our enjoyment of music as much as anything else; it's also the most overlooked.
06/24/2014 | Comments 0

Weak Knees - “IceBevo”

Indie rock has been in a good place as of late. Not caring about being cool is the new cool, and a couple of dudes on guitar, bass and drums can make catchy, earworm songs without being armed to the gills with computer software and vintage synthesizers.
06/17/2014 | Comments 0
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Music
 

Tower of cower


Of the Tower, the metro’s most adventurous post-punk act, builds a show aimed to blow minds and alienate the weak at heart.

Charles Martin October 19th, 2011

Of The Tower with Kill The Reflection and The Secret Post
8 p.m. Saturday
VZD’S Restaurant & Club
4200 N. Western
vzds.com
524-4203
$5

Crowds swelled at the OKC Farmers Public Market, waiting to enter the 2010 Carnality Ball when a handful of Bible-thumping protesters with bullhorns set up shop across the street. Hellfire-and-brimstone Scripture was volleyed at scantily clad women and drag queens, but members of the avant-garde band Of the Tower stormed out in costume, banging drums and shouting back with a bullhorn they’d borrowed.

After an hour of having their evangelizing answered with improvised poetry and music, the protest ended, leaving the revelers to their “sin.”

“It came out of thin air so quickly because we had a natural tendency to do those things, to pull public pranks,” said drummer Todd Plunkett. “That was the point that solidified what we wanted Of  the Tower to become: a kind of spontaneous, improvisational, performance-artist band. That was more fulfilling for us than the show we did.”

In the year and a half since, Of the Tower has explored evocative and shocking performance art to enhance its music’s impact. Front man David Goad decided it was time to take the concept to its full potential for Saturday’s “Halloween spectacle” at VZD’s.

If we play for 50 people, 48 scratch their heads.
—Todd Plunkett


“I want the catharsis of the music represented by the expression and the choreography,” said Goad of his fourth-wall-breaking plans. “It’s right there in front of you rather than just a band onstage. There’s a mixture of fear and anticipation that I’d like to instill in the audience.”

He admitted a danger of alienating audience members, but felt it was time to distinguish Of the Tower as not just another dark-wave act.

“We’ve even talked about doing things that are more happenings,” Plunkett said, mentioning a junkyard show that might include “blowing up a car or something. Things like that are never going to get you on MTV, and if we play for 50 people, we might have 48 scratching their heads. But then there are those two people coming out of the audience to tell us they were waiting for this forever.”

Although the group may appeal to a niche market, Goad said it’s important for people to see someone in town doing this sort of thing.

“In Oklahoma, people get stuck in this routine,” he said. “They do their 9-to-5, they come home and have kids, go to LifeChurch and get bored. They start experimenting with what’s around them, whether drugs or swinging. There is not a lot here that speaks to that despair ... but it’s an important part of Oklahoma culture.”

Photo by Doug Schwarz

 
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