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What the flux?


A local architect retrofits a DeLorean to the one made famous by the classic film ‘Back to the Future.’

Carmen Forman November 23rd, 2011

Surrounded by a hoverboard, a workbench and tools, the garage of a Norman resident houses a time machine ready to take its owner “Back to the Future.”

That’s right: a time machine. Gary Weaver (pictured) is rebuilding a DeLorean DMC-12 to the exact specifications of the famed DeLorean time machine, as constructed by Doc Brown in the 1985 film “Back to the Future,” starring Michael J. Fox.

Weaver’s car is about 99 percent identical to the car in the movie, with the main exception being the vehicle can’t go back in time when the driver hits 88 mph. The car is missing some wires on the inside and doesn’t leave behind flaming tire tracks, either.

Oddly enough, it was the car, not the movie, that first made Weaver want a DeLorean. He saw his first model when he was 8 years old at a car show, then became further enamored with it when he saw it in the Academy Award-winning science-fiction comedy a few years later.

“I saw it and I thought it was the most amazing car I’ve ever seen,” Weaver said.

Currently, he is rebuilding his second DeLorean; he had to sell the first to pay for home repairs. That model ended up in a jewelry and watch museum in England.

Weaver bought his second DeLorean in California for $9,500, and has rebuilt it several times in the past few years. Sometimes, he revisits the build of the car because he gets a new part or finds a way to make the car more accurate to the version depicted in “Back to the Future” and its two sequels.

He wishes he could have a regular car and a time-machine DeLorean, because not surprisingly, his replica draws a lot of attention.

“There’s no real problem with people wanting to see the car and take pictures,” Weaver said. “Sometimes you’ve got to get from point A to point B, and you get stuck at point A and a half, with everyone looking at your flux capacitor.”

Before starting work on his ambitious project, he traveled to California and talked to the original builders and looked for original parts.

By day, Weaver is a project manager at an architecture firm in Oklahoma City, and has used a lot of his model-building skills to fashion the parts on the car that make it a time machine.

“If you put your mind to it, you can accomplish anything,” he said, quoting dialogue from the movie. Watching “Back to the Future” numerous times also has helped him in his endeavors.

With his DeLorean DMC-12 almost complete, Weaver has no plans to sell it. He wants to keep it, drive it and, maybe someday, even let his daughters take it for a spin.

“If I think they’re responsible enough, I’ll find a salt flat somewhere where there are no trees, no bumpers, no cars, and I might let them drive it for about 10 seconds,” Weaver said.

His next project is to work on his “Libyan Van,” the blue Volkswagen Station Wagon like the one driven by the terrorists who shoot Doc Brown (played by Christopher Lloyd) in the first film.

Doc Brown said it best when he said, “the way I see it, if you’re gonna build a time machine into a car, why not do it with some style?”

 
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