Wednesday 23 Apr
 
 

IndianGiver - Understudies

There’s a difference between being derivative and being inspired by something, a line a lot of artists can’t seem to find — or at least don’t care to.
04/22/2014 | Comments 0

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0
Newsletter
Home · Articles · Music · Music · Van go
Music
 

Van go


Although they travel in a van that runs on vegetable oil, The Ragbirds sure fly high on wings of folk rock.

Joshua Boydston January 18th, 2012

The Ragbirds
10:30 p.m. Tuesday
The Deli
309 White, Norman
thedeli.us
321-7048
$10

9 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 25
Belle Isle Restaurant & Brewing Company
50 Penn Place
belleislerestaurant.com
840-1911
$5

Folk-rock flock The Ragbirds preach the same green message as many touring bands, but has taken it a step further by converting its touring van to run on recycled vegetable oil.

Accordingly, look out, metro restaurants, because The Ragbirds might come a-knockin’ while in town for two concerts in Oklahoma City and Norman.

“Every couple of days, we’ll go hunting for grease,” vocalist Erin Zindle said.

“It’s a little extra work than just pulling up to a gas station, but we think it’s worth it.”

The van has become an integral piece of The Ragbirds’ existence, even in their new album, “Travelin’ Machine,” released on New Year’s Day.

“Most of the songs were written on the road. There’s a real, live energy in these songs. All the songs carry that feel ing of movement, adventure and exploration,” Zindle said. “Our van is a character in this band. Her name is Cecilia.”

The title and theme also are indicative of the group’s distinctive, worldly take on folk rock, borrowing heavily from Celtic, gypsy, Latin, African and Middle Eastern sounds.

“I just loved the experience of letting the music transport me where I couldn’t go physically in real life,” said Zindle, who was initially inspired by Paul Simon and Peter Gabriel’s world-fusion pop of the ’80s. “There’s a lot of history, and I felt really connected and opened up by that wider connection to the world.”

Finding a way to combine a globe’s worth of influence into a single record took time to determine, but “Travelin’ Machine” — the band’s fifth studio album since 2005 — finds the blend sounding better than ever. With luck, it will be the one that takes Cecilia even farther on the road.

“It didn’t come together quickly, but I do feel like it comes together naturally. It’s just been a lot of years of listening to and absorbing all these different sounds and finding a way to place that into our music,” Zindle said. “I’ve tried to not force or guide even too strongly in one direction. The songs seem to give clues where they want to go along the way, and sometimes, that’s a lot of different places.”

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close