Friday 18 Apr
 
 

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0

Rachel Brashear — Revolution

Rachel Brashear’s second EP, Revolution, starts with a kick to the shins.
03/18/2014 | Comments 0
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Music Made Me: Cameron Neal


Horse Thief’s lead singer speaks about the five albums that he holds dear.

Matt Carney March 21st, 2012

Grateful Dead, American Beauty (1970)
From the nine months before I was born until now, this album and every other album by The Grateful Dead has been playing in my life. The free-spirit sound and attitude of this band is a huge part of who I am today. This would be a band that has changed the way I’ve thought about more life situations than religion. The smooth feeling of folk with a blend of psychedelic sound waves on this album speaks to me in ways little music does.

Neil Young, Harvest (1972) 
Choosing this album was harder than I thought it’d be, since I’m truly in love with almost everything Neil’s put out. Even to this day, he’s able to experiment with his style. This album needs to be regularly spinning for any songwriter — the lyrics are heavy and inspirational.

The Beach Boys, Pet Sounds (1966)
From a recording standpoint, this album affected the way I thought about everything. The tone and sounds are still some of the cleanest and fullest I’ve heard. The production and instrumentation is some of the most unique since the dawn of music. To create something this great back in the ’60s only makes me wonder how people can move it to the next level nowadays with technology.

Sigur Rós, Takk ... (2005)

My dear friend and drummer, Preston Greer, introduced me to this band during my high school years. I’d spend hours dissecting it, closing my eyes, listening in a dark room, field or mountain landscape. It changed my perspective on how music can achieve fullness without using traditional instruments, and still be rich in emotion. It will always be one of the top spiritual and thought-provoking records in almost any situation. 

 My Morning Jacket, It Still Moves (2003)
A band that got me back into real rock ’n’ roll while holding onto the roots of traditional folk music. I have to thank my father for showing me this band at a critical point in my teenage years. This record isn’t “just another album” to me, but the best way to sum up everything My Morning Jacket can stand for. An incredible soundscape, all recorded in a corn silo.

Read a review of Horse Thief's debut album, Grow Deep, Grow Wild.

 
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