Tuesday 29 Jul
 
 

Planting the seed

Chelsey Cope’s new band, Elms, is as earthy and native to Oklahoma as the trees that are their namesake. The soulful folk four-piece’s debut EP, Parallel Lines, was recorded at Bell Labs Recording Studio in Norman and is on its way in September. But the band has already given us a tease, with its first single, “Burn,” going live on SoundCloud on July 14.
07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Commercial rock

Center of the Universe Festival featuring Capital Cities, Young The Giant, AWOLNATION & more
Friday-Saturday
Downtown Tulsa 
centeroftheuniversefestival.com 
$35-$50 

07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Mack truckin’

Swizzymack
9 p.m. Friday 
Kamp’s Lounge 
1310 NW 25th St. 
lndrnrs.com 
819-6004 
$10-$15 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Chevy cruisin’

Chevy Woods with Kevin Gates & more
9 p.m. Sunday 
Vibe Night Club 
227 SW 25th St. 
$20-$40 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Rock steady

Tesla
7 p.m. Saturday
Frontier City
11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road 
frontiercity.com
478-2140
Free with park admission 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Rock · JD McPherson — Signs &...
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JD McPherson — Signs & Signifiers


All 'Signs' point to excellence.

Matt Carney April 25th, 2012

If anybody in Oklahoma is most likely to capitalize on wide-audience distribution right now, it must be Broken Arrow’s R&B-flavored rocker JD McPherson, whose debut album, Signs & Signifiers, was re-released last week by Rounder Records.

Producer Jimmy Sutton’s precise attention to past details is Mad Men-esque in its re-creation of rockabilly guitar tones, plunking upright jazz bass, and the way it captures Jonathan Doyle’s tenor sax and McPherson’s voice, which is the kind of durable instrument that made an army of slick-haired, suit-wearing bandleaders famous in the 1950s.

It’s more than mere slick act; McPherson sure can sing. He runs the gamut of stylized Chuck Berry swing-guitar tunes (“I Can’t Complain”), spitfire dance numbers (“Scratching Circles”) and even bluesy, soulful standards like Big Tiny Kennedy’s “Country Boy.” And when the snares pick up on “Fire Bug,” McPherson delivers his lines so confidently, you have to imagine he’s toe-tapping in polished black shoes, even in the studio.

Mark my words: He’s going to wind up as one of those guys we can say we knew back when.


 
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