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Happy campers


Day camps in the metro will keep kids active over the summer months.

Mia Cantu May 16th, 2012

Video games and cartoons aren’t your child’s only options for summer fun. With the end of the school year, children in the Oklahoma City metro can keep both brains and bodies active with a slew of summer camp options.

Here are but a few of the possibilities:

Did You Ever?

Science Museum Oklahoma

2100 N.E. 52nd

sciencemuseumok.org

602-3760

The campers at Science Museum Oklahoma’s Did You Ever? program will gain an educational— albeit fun — experience they can’t get elsewhere.
From holograms to glow-in-the-dark Jello, the camp is certain to have the kiddos hooked. Each week, campers work on extended projects that include creating a stop-motion animated film, constructing a splash park and building a solar-powered oven. For the week of July 4, campers will learn all about rockets and build their own fireworks.

“We’re going to do stuff with them that they couldn’t do at home or even at school,” said Shannon Sommers, day camp warden.

And she’s not kidding, considering that Sommers’ duties include walking on broken glass and eating fire for the entertainment of campers.

“We’re tricking them into learning,” she said.


Camp Invention

Westminster School

600 N.W. 44th

invent.org/camp

The name of Camp Invention is a bit of a giveaway as to its focus on exploring creativity and innovation. Kids at the camp, which also has locations in Tulsa and Sapulpa, can learn from experiments such as building balloon-bursting machines and making a trip to the imaginary island of Magnetropolis.


Thunder Youth Basketball Camps

various locations

nba.com/thunder/community/youth_ basketball.html

The campers at Science Museum Oklahoma’s Did You Ever? program will gain an educational— albeit fun — experience they can’t get elsewhere.

From holograms to glow-in-thedark Jello, the camp is certain to have the kiddos hooked.

Each week, campers work on extended projects that include creating a stop-motion animated film, constructing a splash park and building a solar-powered oven. For the week of July 4, campers will learn all about For aspiring hoopsters of any skill level, Thunder Youth Basketball camps will be held at six metro locations and offer three variations: five-day camps, one- to three-day camps, and four sessions. Boys and girls between 5-16 can attend, and will be taught the fundamentals of basketball, as well as the key aspects of teamwork, sportsmanship and respect by Thunder youth coaches.


Camp Chaverim Temple B’Nai Israel

4901 N. Penn

jfedokc.org

848-3132

Operated by the Jewish Federation of OKC, Camp Chaverim kindles children’s sense of adventure with I-Spy field trips, swimming, arts and crafts, sports, sailing and more. Kids learn about Jewish values and the importance of volunteerism, while having a blast making lifelong friends, which is what “chaverim” translates as in Hebrew.


Camp DaKaNi

3309 E. Hefner

campfireusa-ok.org

478-5646

Embracing with adventure, Camp DaKaNi gives boys and girls a chance to experience nature through archery, canoeing, hiking, rock-climbing, fishing, sing-a-longs, games and more on 33 wooded acres. The camp is operated by Camp Fire USA.


I’m Artsy and I Know It!

City Arts Center

3000 General Pershing

cityartscenter.org

951-0000

Children cultivate their inner artist at the City Arts Center’s summer camp. I’m Artsy and I Know It! offers artbased courses focused on weaving and printmaking, painting, pottery and much more.


Summer on the Farm

Keystone Adventure School and Farm

19201 N. Western, Edmond

keystoneadventureschoolandfarm.com

216-5400

If your kids want a dose of farm life, check out Summer on the Farm at the Keystone Adventure School and Farm, where city meets country.

Kids spend plenty of time outdoors playing in the water and caring for the animals — llamas, chickens and horses — but there will also be indoor-time to play “city.” In that game, campers create their own businesses and build their own tents.

“The kids stay active because they’re not sitting around watching TV,” said Janelle Sparks, Keystone administrative assistant.

“They’re getting physical activity and practicing math and reading, all while having fun in a beautiful environment.”


 
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