Monday 28 Jul
 
 

Food briefs: You’re toast, er, pretzel

There’s a new food truck on the scene.
07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Upward mobility

Locals can have fresh microgreens and herbs for cooking in a new and convenient way. Microgreens, a chef favorite, are petite vegetable greens that add color, nutrition and flavor to dishes.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Vietnamese comfort food

I’ve always had a love affair with the refreshing, healthy cuisine of Vietnam. I love the fragrances, the fresh herbs, cilantro, basil, mint and other Asian herbs: perilla, Vietnamese coriander and sawtooth cilantro. And I love the contrast and balance in almost every dish: spicy vs. cool, salty vs. sweet and steamed vs. crispy.
07/16/2014 | Comments 0

OKG eat: Cool places, cooler drinks

We know. It’s hot. It’s summer in Oklahoma. Cool down by sampling cocktails that local bars and restaurants have concocted just for you. Find a nice, air conditioned space or a shaded patio and while away the hours drinking the flavors of summer. You might decide it’s not that bad after all.

— by Devon Green, photos by Mark Hancock, Shannon Cornman and Lauren Hamilton

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

New kids on the block

There are a wealth of new local eateries cropping up in the metro and even more coming. If they’re not on your radar, they should be. From the comfy atmosphere at The Barrel on Western Avenue to the laid-back vibe at the Plaza District’s coffee shop, you might find a new regular hangout.

— by Devon Green, photos by Mark Hancock and Shannon Cornman

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

OKG Eat

Ah, the perils of working with special dietary needs. It can make dining out a pain. Luckily, with restaurateurs becoming more savvy to their diners’ needs, there are a bevy of places in OKC to satisfy your craving for the foods you love without losing taste. All choices this week have been road-tested by gluten-sensitive foodies to guarantee satisfaction.
07/09/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Food · Restaurant Reviews · Still in Saigon
Restaurant Reviews
 

Still in Saigon


With diverse textures and flavors, the Saigon Baguette sandwiches are a gift from out of this world.

Greg Elwell July 25th, 2012

Saigon Baguette
2426 N. Classen Blvd.
524-2660
What works:
Barbecue pork banh mi and egg rolls for crazy cheap.
What needs work:
The line can get a little long.
Tips:
Take cash. The entrance is the door on the east side of the building.

Credit: Mark Hancock

There’s nothing I hate more than a boring sandwich.

Well, that’s not true. I hate a lot of things more, but I don’t come into contact with them nearly as often as I do boring sandwiches. Rarely, for instance, do I step inside a restaurant and witness genocide. But lots of places have boring sandwiches.

And I suppose that’s because there are a lot of boring people who want two slices of textureless bread around some dry, flavorless turkey and cheese that tastes like it came from glum cows.

Those people should stay away from Banh Mi Ba Le/Saigon Baguette/The Milk Bottle, because although the place serves simple sandwiches, they’re far from boring. This humble shop trafficks in a delicious sandwich that combines Vietnamese flavors with good French bread, called the banh mi.

The recipe is an easy one: Fill a chewy, crusty section of baguette with pork or chicken or lunch meat or meatballs, then add in onion, jalapeño, radish, cilantro and cucumber. What you have is both a sandwich and a stick of flavored dynamite. Take a bite and wait for the explosion.

Another thing you should know:

Saigon Baguette is cheap — almost suspiciously cheap. A sandwich is $2.50, tax included. Ponder that for a moment and ask yourself this question: Is this the first step in an alien invasion?

These sandwiches are tasty and, at only $2.50, you can afford more than one. Now you’re getting fat off delicious roast pork and bread. And what if there’s a mind-control agent in the sauce? These aliens have an army of overweight slaves ready to heed their commands!

But I digress. I’ve tried and enjoyed all of the varieties Saigon Baguette offers, but the one I keep going back for is the barbecue pork. It’s a little sweet and a little spicy. Add in those peppers and you’ve got something that sets my mouth and eyes watering.

Several people swear by the Saigon sub, which includes pork, lunch meat and pâté, but it’s probably the one I’m least likely to try again. Oh, and for those who don’t dig on swine, there’s a chicken banh mi, as well.

Whichever you choose, take some time to savor the star of the sandwich that most people forget: the bread. The baguette works perfectly with these fillings, demanding that diners actually chew the bread to eat it, rather than letting it dissolve into your mouth like some discount grocery store’s white bread.

That said, I know some people who don’t even get sandwiches and I can’t even blame them. While the banh mi is Saigon Baguette’s big draw, the restaurant also makes some amazing deep-fried egg rolls that are, for my money, the best in the city.

These greasy, crispy rolls are too good to skip, even if they’re part of a long-term plan to subjugate the human race by our soon-to-be overlords. Use the sweet chili dipping sauce that’s included and you are in for a treat. Oh, and they’re also incredibly cheap. Three rolls will run you $2.

A sandwich, three egg rolls and a drink costs less than $6. Surely there’s something amiss about all this, right? Well, kind of.

Don’t plan to eat in the Milk Bottle. All that food is to go, so you should get going and find a spot to sit outside. Oh, and bring cash. The Conquerors From Beyond the Stars won’t take credit cards.

So, drive on over to Saigon Baguette and park in the old Cao Nguyen lot. Pay a pittance for a feast and say “good-bye” to boring sandwiches. (And “hello” to your new extraterrestrial rulers.)

Oklahoma Gazette’s restaurant review policy is to highlight the positive aspects, and include constructive criticism regarding food, ambience or service when appropriate.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close