Tuesday 22 Jul
 
 

Chevy cruisin’

Chevy Woods with Kevin Gates & more
9 p.m. Sunday 
Vibe Night Club 
227 SW 25th St. 
$20-$40 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Rock steady

Tesla
7 p.m. Saturday
Frontier City
11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road 
frontiercity.com
478-2140
Free with park admission 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Narrative verse

L.T.Z. with Jabee, Frank Black & more
8 p.m. Saturday
The Conservatory 
8911 N. Western Ave. 
conservatoryokc.com 
607-4805
$7 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Dancing in the Twilight

Sunday Twilight Concert Series with The Wurly Birds
7:30 p.m. Sunday
Myriad Botanical Gardens 
301 W. Reno Ave. 
myriadgardens.org 
445-7080
Free 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Next big thing

As far as songs go, few prove as challenging to sing as our national anthem.

It’s a technically demanding tune from first note to last, to be sure, beginning with a low bellow that quickly soars toward star-punching high notes, eventually swelling to a show-stopping crescendo that even the most seasoned performer can have trouble mastering.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Rock · The Electric Primadonnas —...
Rock
 

The Electric Primadonnas — Clergymen


Joshua Boydston January 2nd, 2013

Oklahoma City psych rockers The Electric Primadonnas have been in hibernation for what feels like a couple of years, only emerging from their slumber for the occasional show or to leak a rough cut of a track.

The band snaps wide awake with Clergymen.

The album sounds like the sort of surreal dreams the collective must have been having in the time leading up to last month’s release.

Clergymen plays like a version of Alice in Wonderland painted in pastel watercolors: bold ideas and bolder actions portrayed by a watchful eye and deliberate stroke of the hand — bright, but purposefully restrained.

The Electric Primadonnas bring a light, fun spin into their respective dips into dream pop (the deliciously dazed “The Bird”), freak folk (opener “Underpants,” moving in early moments like Merriweather Post Pavilion-era Animal Collective) and straight-up psychedelia (the mushroom-fed “The Night”).

The Primadonnas can recall anyone from Beach House and Pink Floyd (“Intuition”) to Grizzly Bear and Tame Impala (album highlight “I’m Not Certain Anymore”), even within the span of a couple of minutes. It’s the sort of impressive musical prowess and flexibility that is getting harder and harder to find.

It’s an impressive effort from first note to last, closing with the delightful one-two punch of the bouncy “Lucy Says” and mind-bending “What Is It to Be?,” a dream you’ll want to have again the second you wake.

Get a free listen at reverbnation.com/theelectricprimadonnas. —Joshua Boydston

 
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