Wednesday 30 Jul
 
 

Sobering sounds

Copperheads with Depth & Current, Dudes of America and Oblivious

10 p.m. Saturday

Opolis

113 N. Crawford Ave., Norman

opolis.org

447-3417

$7

07/30/2014 | Comments 0

Pony expression

Wild Ponies

8 p.m. Sunday

The Blue Door

2805 N. McKinley Ave.

bluedoorokc.com

524-0738

$15

07/30/2014 | Comments 0

Music Made Me: Josh Hogsett

Few, if any, Oklahoma bands have seen a rise as meteoric as Tallows over the past year, yet its seemingly overnight ascension didn’t happen by chance. The Oklahoma City four-piece is well-versed in the ways of modern pop songwriting, drawing from both glitchy electronica and cathartic indie rock in equal measure. Last year, the band pulled off a rare musical feat with its debut album, Memory Marrow, which was steeped heavily in the breadth of recent history yet managed to sound like nothing else before it.
07/30/2014 | Comments 0

Planting the seed

Chelsey Cope’s new band, Elms, is as earthy and native to Oklahoma as the trees that are their namesake. The soulful folk four-piece’s debut EP, Parallel Lines, was recorded at Bell Labs Recording Studio in Norman and is on its way in September. But the band has already given us a tease, with its first single, “Burn,” going live on SoundCloud on July 14.
07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Commercial rock

Center of the Universe Festival featuring Capital Cities, Young The Giant, AWOLNATION & more
Friday-Saturday
Downtown Tulsa 
centeroftheuniversefestival.com 
$35-$50 

07/22/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Rock · The Grown Ups — Dark Hearts
Rock
 

The Grown Ups — Dark Hearts


Zach Hale February 27th, 2013

It's pretty clear that The Grown Ups know what good music sounds like. When the band ceases its emulation of good music and lets its creativity flow naturally, the Oklahoma City collective's new album, Dark Hearts, offers flashes of genuine talent.

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Take "Catalina," for example: the consummate portrayal of the group’s strengths. The song's first half consists of a hushed guitar strum, sparkling piano and a steady, mid-tempo rhythm to guide them. It's morose and contemplative in a way that's almost reminiscent of the dampened grandeur Modest Mouse perfected on The Moon & Antarctica.

Yet at the track's halfway point, as if to fend off the melancholy, "Catalina" is reborn as a jovial, synth-driven dance number with an instantly infectious hook. The left turn represents not only a stark shift in dynamics, but also the originality that's largely unexplored throughout Dark Hearts’ remainder.

Each song here is easily discernible from the others. Yet it's clear the band made a strident effort to mix things up from track to track — an admirable, but ultimately contrived endeavor. Some take on a darker, more industrial temperament ("Beauty and the Beast," "Never Get Out"), and these are the moments that distract from and, frankly, flat-out ignore The Grown Ups’ strengths.

Ironically, the more lighthearted melodies offer the most mystique — moments when The Grown Ups’ talent and sincerity are plainly evident. Ultimately, however, Dark Hearts sounds like a band still in search of its true self. —Zach Hale

 
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