Wednesday 30 Jul
 
 

Escape from Tomorrow

With Escape from Tomorrow, one fears the story behind the movie would loom larger than the movie itself. Luckily, that is not the case. After all, it opens with a decapitation on Disney World’s Big Thunder Mountain Railroad roller coaster.
05/06/2014 | Comments 0

Sorcerer

William Friedkin spends a lot of time in his 2013 memoir discussing why Sorcerer didn't click with critics and audiences even though he believes it to be better than his previous film, The Exorcist. Now that Warner Home Video has reissued Sorcerer on Blu-ray, we can see what Friedkin's fuss is all about.
04/23/2014 | Comments 0

Broadchurch: The Complete First Season

Welcome to the coastal resort of Broadchurch, population … oh, who can keep track, what will all the corpses? Yes, Broadchurch is yet another British television procedural involving the search for a murderer in a quaint little town, just like the limited series The Fall and Top of the Lake.
04/23/2014 | Comments 0

Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones

Essentially part five in the ridiculously profitable horror franchise, Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones continues the found-footage conceit of the other films. The difference is instead of the scares taking place in rich white suburbia, they do so in a junky apartment complex on a largely Latino side of Oxnard, Calif.
04/23/2014 | Comments 0

Holy Ghost People

Holy Ghost People examines two sisters whose bond is torn — but by what? After her sibling has been missing for more than a year, Charlotte (Emma Greenwell, TV's Shameless) intends to find out.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Movies · Drama · 42
Drama
 

42


This Jackie Robinson biopic is a solid hit.

Phil Bacharach April 23rd, 2013

In chronicling the real-life tale of Jackie Robinson, who broke Major League Baseball’s color barrier in 1947 when he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers, 42 is schmaltzy, sentimental and shameless. There is no dabbling in highfalutin niceties like subtext or nuance. Writer-director Brian Helgeland, who penned the hardly simplistic L.A. Confidential, keeps his focus simple and is content to let his hero worship fly.

And that’s fine with me. 42 — the number Robinson wore on his uniform — tells an important story that, almost inconceivably, has eluded big-screen treatment since Robinson himself starred in 1950’s The Jackie Robinson Story.

Relative unknown Chadwick Boseman (TV’s Persons Unknown) gives a stirring, if uncomplicated, performance as the supremely gifted ballplayer who was playing in the Negro Leagues when Dodgers general manager Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford, Cowboys & Aliens) plucked him for the “great experiment” of integrating baseball. Ford lapses into caricature as the crustier-than-crusty Rickey, but the approach seems fitting for a movie so proudly old-fashioned.

In fact, the whole production feels like the cinematic version of an old baseball storybook aimed at adolescents. But the saga of Robinson, who endured the bigotry of his time without fighting back — a promise he had made Rickey as a condition of his being the trailblazer — is too inspiring to really screw up. Thankfully, 42 delivers the goods. —Phil Bacharach

Hey! Read This:
Cowboys & Aliens film review
L.A. Confidential: Special Edition DVD review     

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close