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Sculpt fiction


Two renowned sculptors combine for one sharp exhibition at [Artspace] at Untitled.

Louis Fowler April 24th, 2013

Don Reitz and Marko Kratohvil
through June 1
[Artspace] at Untitled
1 N.E. Third
artspaceatuntitled.org
815-9995
free

Marko Kratohvil’s Composition 2
Pablo Picasso once said that “sculpture is the art of intelligence.” If this is truly the case, prepare to have your smarts doubled, as [Artspace] at Untitled’s latest exhibition presents not one, but two renowned sculptors.

American ceramicist Don Reitz and internationally recognized artist Marko Kratohvil present works that Erin McGlothlin, the venue’s public relations and development director, said are “interactive” in a way that previous exhibits haven’t been.

“What’s different about these, I think, is the way they interact with the viewer,” McGlothlin said. “Marko’s are so clean and sharp, his sculptures in steel, and Don’s are very expressive. I think the viewer will get a well-rounded feeling from the way that they both interact.”

Now on display through June 1, the exhibition is “90 percent sculpture,” but also featuring monoprints and drawings from Reitz and Kratohvil. As different as these artists’ works appear to the eye, McGlothlin said they were chosen for how reciprocal they actually are.

“It’s a unique way for viewers to look at sculpture. The physicality of it is so different. It really gives you a more emotive response personally,” McGlothlin said. “Reitz’s work is so textural and organic and really interacts with the viewers that way, especially in its spatial relationships. Marko’s work is that same way; however, his style is so different, they really complement each other well.”

Reitz is based out of Clarkdale, Ariz., while Yugoslavian-born Kratohvil now lives in Oklahoma City. He said he is happy to have his art featured at [Artspace], mostly because it has “such a great reputation in the art community.”

“Most of my interest is in, I would call it, psychological landscapes,” Kratohvil said. “The subjects I deal with are interactions and things like that, but formally, it’s a composition, and explores the relationships between composition and form, concept and form, and that of my main drive: motion of movements, speeds, acceleration and similar things.”

Kratohvil hopes that viewers of his work will be moved by it and “go home with a bit more of a visual experience than before they saw my exhibition.”

McGlothlin agreed. “I hope they can feel like they got a good experience from how many different mediums there are and how everything kind of draws from different aspects of each artist. And they can really appreciate the entire feeling the artist is trying to convey.”

 
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