Friday 25 Jul
 
 

Planting the seed

Chelsey Cope’s new band, Elms, is as earthy and native to Oklahoma as the trees that are their namesake. The soulful folk four-piece’s debut EP, Parallel Lines, was recorded at Bell Labs Recording Studio in Norman and is on its way in September. But the band has already given us a tease, with its first single, “Burn,” going live on SoundCloud on July 14.
07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Commercial rock

Center of the Universe Festival featuring Capital Cities, Young The Giant, AWOLNATION & more
Friday-Saturday
Downtown Tulsa 
centeroftheuniversefestival.com 
$35-$50 

07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Mack truckin’

Swizzymack
9 p.m. Friday 
Kamp’s Lounge 
1310 NW 25th St. 
lndrnrs.com 
819-6004 
$10-$15 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Chevy cruisin’

Chevy Woods with Kevin Gates & more
9 p.m. Sunday 
Vibe Night Club 
227 SW 25th St. 
$20-$40 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Rock steady

Tesla
7 p.m. Saturday
Frontier City
11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road 
frontiercity.com
478-2140
Free with park admission 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Rock · Them Hounds — Them Hounds
Rock
 

Them Hounds — Them Hounds


Zach Hale July 17th, 2013

If there’s one defining characteristic of modern blues rock, it’s that the songs often are constructed around the band’s instrumental strengths.

Given the parameters of what actually constitutes the blues, it’s easy to see why: There just aren’t that many variations of the genre’s 12-bar framework that retain that “bluesy feel.”

Instead, its divergences usually come in the form of vocal variance and guitar solos, and Them Hounds thrive within these confines.

Two things immediately jump out at you on the Oklahoma City quartet’s self-titled debut album: Erin Ames has a voice tailor-made for rock ’n’ roll and guitarist Michael Franklin sure can pound out a Zeppelin riff. These cats (er, hounds) know how to rock out, and they do so with regularity.

Opening track “Out the Window” unfurls in a way that embodies the very fiber of contemporary blues rock, mimicking some of its more illustrious mainstays (Wolfmother, Band of Skulls). “The Fix,” meanwhile, finds a staccato rhythm giving way to a soaring bridge/chorus release, a formula that’s successfully rocked arenas for decades.

That said, moments like these almost sound too easy for the band. You nearly wish Them Hounds would branch out to challenge themselves a bit more. Once the group frees itself from the limitations of genre, no telling how far it — and Ames’ howl — will go.

In this sense, Them Hounds is less of a career-defining statement and more a glimpse of potential — and boy, do they have lots of it. —Zach Hale


 
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