Monday 28 Jul
 
 

TJ Mayes - "When Love Comes Down"

’50s era rock ’n’ roll had been long overdue for a rebirth. Thankfully, the stockpile of capable luminaries has not been in short supply over the past few years. 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Boare - "playdatshit"

The world is in the midst of an electronic music renaissance, and you find most of this boon of producers laying claim to the club-friendly, bass-dropping variety, holing up in the the free-flowing world of hip-hop beatmaking or pitching their tent on the out-there, boundary-pushing EDM camp.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Broncho - "Class Historian"

Broncho has never been hurting in the hook department. The success of the trio’s 2011 debut, Can’t Get Past the Lips, was predicated mostly on its ability to marry melodies with kinetic guitar riffs and anarchic energy. Yet we’ve heard nothing to the degree of pure pop catchiness on display in “Class Historian,” the new single from Broncho’s upcoming sophomore album, Just Enough Hip to Be Woman.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Manmade Objects - Monuments

No one wants to be forgotten; everyone wants some sort of legacy, a mark they leave behind as they exit this life for whatever lies beyond.

And for as long as there has been death, there have been monuments — whether austere or understated, abstract or concrete, prominent or tucked away in private — erected by the ones they loved to assure that remembrance, at least for a time.
07/15/2014 | Comments 0

Admirals - Amidst the Blue

Sometimes it helps to not be very good.

Some of the best albums and artists were born out of happy accidents owed to varying degrees of early suckage — the perfect note or chord for a song found by missing the one you are aiming for, failed mimicry of an idol bearing something entirely new and great instead.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0
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Music
 

Watermelon Slim and the Workers return for bluesy benefit


C.G. Niebank May 22nd, 2008

Oklahoma natives Watermelon Slim and the Workers will perform at the Will Rogers Theatre 6 p.m. Saturday along with The Reverb Brothers, The Rexall Rangers and several other performers who will take t...

Watermelon-Slim_EP06

Oklahoma natives Watermelon Slim and the Workers will perform at the Will Rogers Theatre 6 p.m. Saturday along with The Reverb Brothers, The Rexall Rangers and several other performers who will take the stage to benefit The Referral Center, a local nonprofit that helps drug addicts detox and find recovery.

William "Watermelon Slim" Homans was nominated with his band for six Blues Music Awards for the second year in a row. Slim and his band were given awards for best Album and Band of the Year May 8 in Tunica, Miss.

CHRONICLE
Slim's music career started in the Seventies when he taught himself to play slide guitar, using a cigarette lighter as a slide, while confined to a Veteran's Administration hospital bed, subsequent to his service in Vietnam. He went on to record a self-produced album of antiwar protest songs, earn several college degrees, work for 12 years as a long-distance trucker hauling hazardous waste, and yes, grow watermelons on a farm near Snow in southeastern Oklahoma.

Sandwiched between these endeavors, which were engaged in to pay off college loans, Slim found time to play with a variety of blues luminaries that included Bonnie Raitt, Robert Cray, Champion Jack Dupree and John Lee Hooker.

A near-fatal heart attack in 2002 propelled Slim back to a renewed full-time commitment to music. Upon recovery, Slim recorded the 2002 CD "Big Shoes to Fill," which became a calling card as he drove coast-to-coast, playing at any venue where he could get booked. The next year, Slim released "Up Close & Personal," and his tireless roadwork paid off when he was nominated in 2005 as best New Artist Debut award by the voting members of The Blues Foundation. The same year, "Up Close & Personal" was named the No. 1 Southern Blues CD of the Year by Real Blues magazine. " C.G.Niebank

 
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