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TJ Mayes - "When Love Comes Down"

’50s era rock ’n’ roll had been long overdue for a rebirth. Thankfully, the stockpile of capable luminaries has not been in short supply over the past few years. 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Boare - "playdatshit"

The world is in the midst of an electronic music renaissance, and you find most of this boon of producers laying claim to the club-friendly, bass-dropping variety, holing up in the the free-flowing world of hip-hop beatmaking or pitching their tent on the out-there, boundary-pushing EDM camp.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Broncho - "Class Historian"

Broncho has never been hurting in the hook department. The success of the trio’s 2011 debut, Can’t Get Past the Lips, was predicated mostly on its ability to marry melodies with kinetic guitar riffs and anarchic energy. Yet we’ve heard nothing to the degree of pure pop catchiness on display in “Class Historian,” the new single from Broncho’s upcoming sophomore album, Just Enough Hip to Be Woman.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Manmade Objects - Monuments

No one wants to be forgotten; everyone wants some sort of legacy, a mark they leave behind as they exit this life for whatever lies beyond.

And for as long as there has been death, there have been monuments — whether austere or understated, abstract or concrete, prominent or tucked away in private — erected by the ones they loved to assure that remembrance, at least for a time.
07/15/2014 | Comments 0

Admirals - Amidst the Blue

Sometimes it helps to not be very good.

Some of the best albums and artists were born out of happy accidents owed to varying degrees of early suckage — the perfect note or chord for a song found by missing the one you are aiming for, failed mimicry of an idol bearing something entirely new and great instead.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0
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Jerome-coming


Hip-hopper Gregory Jerome might not be a household name, but he's determined to change that in 2014.

Louis Fowler December 23rd, 2013

Gregory Jerome is quick to clarify that he’s not a typical rapper — instead a positive, thought-provoking hip-hop artist. He also feels that may be why, since returning to Oklahoma City five years ago after a stint in Nashville, his music has been ignored by the mainstream.

Gregory Jerome is quick to clarify that he’s not a typical rapper — instead a positive, thought-provoking hip-hop artist. He also feels that may be why, since returning to Oklahoma City five years ago after a stint in Nashville, his music has been ignored by the mainstream.

“It’s not trendy music,” Jerome said. “It’s just like the radio. The radio doesn’t get on the positive note of hip-hop, the positive messages of the people, so they go with what they see as more marketable. I’m not the typical performer that you see just targeting one group of people. I kind of like to spread it out.”

Building a fan base solely on his music, Jerome has garnered an inthe-know cult around him, much like hip-hop had to in the early ’80s. That makes sense to him, however, as his first exposure to the genre came from his older brother, an old-school DJ who made a living on the wheels of steel.

“What captured me was the first time I heard Kurtis Blow,” Jerome reminisced. “That was pretty much my introduction to hip-hop. My brother used to spin all these different records, and that’s where a lot of my hip-hop inspirations started. It became a way for me to cope with emotions and to have an outlet to express those emotions, whether in my personal life or dealing with social or political change, whatever the case may be. It’s a place where I could transcend my thoughts of the world.”

Like old-school hip-hop performers, Jerome said he writes about the world around him, from the various cultures he comes in contact with in OKC to the people he meets in the various organizations he works for. It’s this realism that he believes differentiates his music from others’ in the scene.

“I’m able to relate to individuals who have endured or are currently going through or persevered through the beautiful struggle,” Jerome said. “To be in a position where I am at, to give hope through lyrics and songs that people can relate to is a wonderful thing. Because real people can’t relate to Bentleys and Mercedes and diamond rings and chains. It’s a more realistic approach.”

He said he is “thrilled” to bring his positive angle on hip-hop to the masses as part of the Arts Council of Oklahoma City’s annual Opening Night event, sharing the stage with local acts such as Paperscissor, Adam & Kizzie, Susan Herndon and Edgar Cruz. With such a packed bill, Jerome said he is doing everything in his power to craft a live show audiences in the metro haven’t seen before.

“I’m doing cross-genres of music, and I intertwine hip-hop with it. We’re doing some Pink Floyd, and we’re gonna throw some hip-hop on top of it — some Beatles, some Elton John, and just mix it up with hip-hop. It’s going to be something that the city really hasn’t ever been exposed to. All I can say is expect the unexpected.”

 
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12.24.2013 at 10:14 Reply

I am so glad to see this! I first met Gregory Jerome in 2002 in Tennessee when I heard a dope lyricist freestyling from across the room in LRC 221 at MTSU. I invited him over to my studio to begin work on our first project together and it's been grind time ever since...

"Can you tell me the true meaning of nothing? Cause that's where I started/further in the future, now departed..." --Reality aka Gregory Jerome (from "Want More Get More featuring BUNKS recorded in 2003).

 

 
 
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