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Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History's exhibit prepares for departure


Gazette staff August 21st, 2008

After 'while, crocodile. Having debuted in late May, the exhibit "The Science of SuperCroc" will disappear after Sunday from the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 2401 N. Chautauqua in No...

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After 'while, crocodile.

Having debuted in late May, the exhibit "The Science of SuperCroc" will disappear after Sunday from the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, 2401 N. Chautauqua in Norman.

Two highlights of this prehistoric showcase are the Sarcosuchus imperator (aka "SuperCroc") and the Nigersaurus taqueti, which visiting kids can see up close.

According to museum officials, SuperCroc lived 110 million years ago, and its name means "flesh crocodile emperor." At 40 feet long and 17,000 pounds, it was one of the largest crocodiles in history, and big enough to make meals of dinosaurs.

Its skull " the real deal is featured at the exhibit, along with a full-scale replica of the entire skeleton " measures 6 feet long and contains 130 teeth. There's also a touchable skull for hands-on involvement. Children's other senses can be stimulated through audio clips of how the SuperCroc may have sounded and a National Geographic video about its discovery in the Sahara desert.

Meanwhile, Nigersaurus " believed to be prey for SuperCroc " is a dinosaur with a body the size of an elephant and a 6-foot-long neck. It also is represented with a full-scale reproduction. Nigersaurus' brief stay at Sam Noble was the first time it had been displayed outside of Washington, D.C.

The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $3 for kids 6-17, $4 for seniors and $5 for adults. For more information, call 325-4712.

"Rod Lott

 

 
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