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TJ Mayes - "When Love Comes Down"

’50s era rock ’n’ roll had been long overdue for a rebirth. Thankfully, the stockpile of capable luminaries has not been in short supply over the past few years. 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Boare - "playdatshit"

The world is in the midst of an electronic music renaissance, and you find most of this boon of producers laying claim to the club-friendly, bass-dropping variety, holing up in the the free-flowing world of hip-hop beatmaking or pitching their tent on the out-there, boundary-pushing EDM camp.
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Broncho - "Class Historian"

Broncho has never been hurting in the hook department. The success of the trio’s 2011 debut, Can’t Get Past the Lips, was predicated mostly on its ability to marry melodies with kinetic guitar riffs and anarchic energy. Yet we’ve heard nothing to the degree of pure pop catchiness on display in “Class Historian,” the new single from Broncho’s upcoming sophomore album, Just Enough Hip to Be Woman.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Manmade Objects - Monuments

No one wants to be forgotten; everyone wants some sort of legacy, a mark they leave behind as they exit this life for whatever lies beyond.

And for as long as there has been death, there have been monuments — whether austere or understated, abstract or concrete, prominent or tucked away in private — erected by the ones they loved to assure that remembrance, at least for a time.
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Admirals - Amidst the Blue

Sometimes it helps to not be very good.

Some of the best albums and artists were born out of happy accidents owed to varying degrees of early suckage — the perfect note or chord for a song found by missing the one you are aiming for, failed mimicry of an idol bearing something entirely new and great instead.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0
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Oklahoma City University screens film on unsolved Chinese disaster


Paige Lawler October 8th, 2009

Americans tend to focus completely on what's happening here and often overlook other countries that are struggling to catch up to the technological lifestyle we live every day. Filmmaker Jia Zha...

Americans tend to focus completely on what's happening here and often overlook other countries that are struggling to catch up to the technological lifestyle we live every day. Filmmaker Jia Zhang-ke brings attention to this issue by focusing on a disaster in China that remains unsolved.

Oklahoma City University, 2501 N. Blackwelder, continues its "This I Believe" film series with Zhang-ke's touching fictional interpretation, "Still Life."

Construction of the Three Gorges Dam along the Yangtze River has flooded parts of Central China, and demands for generating electric power have displaced more than a million people. Zhang-ke, who was named one of the most gifted filmmakers of our time by The New York Times, illustrates this moment in history by focusing on those forced to relocate.

SALVAGE
Chinese cities inhabited for more than 2,000 years were left in ruins by the flooding, some communities literally left under water. In Zhang-ke's film, he introduces a nurse and a miner who both attempt to salvage anything left behind while accepting the fate of what's gone forever.

OCU Film Institute director Harbour Winn said the film is not only informative, but helps audiences feel the emotion associated with this disastrous event.

"With a film like 'Still Life,' I get a sense that I could never feel by just reading a newspaper article," he said.

This year's "This I Believe" theme is inspired from the popular series formerly broadcasted by National Public Radio, as well as essays by iconic American broadcast journalist Edward R. Murrow and other extraordinary writers.

Zhang-ke's film strives to continue Murrow's concept of contemporary expression that will help Oklahomans open their eyes to the problems other countries face.

The "This I Believe" series extends through March 7, 2010. "Still Life" screens 2 p.m. Sunday in the Kerr McGee Auditorium in OCU's Meinders School of Business. A discussion will follow the film. Admission is free. For more information, call 208-5472. "Paige Lawler

 
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