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Country stars Miranda Lambert and Justin Moore get adjusted to their public lives as entertainers


Alanna Conaway January 7th, 2010

Brad Paisley with Miranda Lambert and Justin Moore7:30 p.m. FridayFord Center100 W. RenoWWW.OkFordCenter.com(800) 745-3000$39.75-$54.75Since exploding onto the country music scene in 2003, Miranda Lam...

mirandalambert2
Brad Paisley with Miranda Lambert and Justin Moore
7:30 p.m. Friday
Ford Center
100 W. Reno
WWW.OkFordCenter.com
(800) 745-3000
$39.75-$54.75

Since exploding onto the country music scene in 2003, Miranda Lambert has scored several hit singles from her three albums, all of which have debuted at the No. 1 position on Billboard's Top Country Albums chart.

MOORE MUSIC

This week, she joins country superstar Brad Paisley on the last leg of his "American Saturday Night" tour, which also features rising newcomer Justin Moore. Early in her career, Lambert toured with the likes of George Strait, Kenny Chesney, Dierks Bentley, Toby Keith and Keith Urban, so she stated that joining Paisley out on the road is "icing on the cake."

The show rolls into the Ford Center on Friday, which has Lambert excited for many reasons " one being that she is close to her farm in Tishomingo, where she lives just miles down the road from her country boyfriend and Okie, Blake Shelton.

"(My farm) has been the most amazing place. I feel like I gained some independence by buying some land, some animals, and raising chickens. I really feel very grown-up now," said the Texas native. "But for my mother's sake, I won't call Oklahoma my home state!

"I love it, though. It's so much like Texas. Sometimes, I think the rivalry is just funny because we're so much alike " the people from where I came from and now where I have my farm. It's beautiful there. It's 45 minutes from the (Texas) border, and it's two hours from any airport. Sometimes it sucks when you have two hours to drive home, but once you get there, it's worth it!"

With her latest album, "Revolution," Lambert showcases another side of her music and delicately removes the "crazy girl with the gun" image that she's been known for with hits like "Kerosene" (a song about seeking revenge on a cheating boyfriend by soaking what's left in kerosene and burning it down) and "Gunpowder and Lead" (where she anticipates welcoming home an abusive ex at the front door with her shotgun in hand, ready to show him "what this little girl is made of").

"I'm a little more stable in my life (now)," Lambert said with a laugh. "I have the regular, small-town-girl side to me that likes to make cupcakes and live on a farm, and then I have this rowdy, crazy, head-banging, rock-stargirl side that is my life on the road. I feel this record shows a more complete picture of who I am."

"Revolution" contains 15 tracks, all of which were penned from the heart of the 26-year-old who proudly notes that the one thing that inspires her is music. The disc has already scored the singer two hit songs, including "Dead Flowers" and her latest single, "White Liar."

"I mean every word I say in every lyric of every song on this record and every record I've ever done," Lambert said. "I would never take back one word or one lyric or point I've ever made, because it's part of who I am. If you're into honesty, I have the record for you!"

MOORE MUSIC
The past seven years that Justin Moore has been in Nashville, Tenn., have finally paid off. In 2009, he released his self-titled first album, which debuted on the country chart at No. 3, and scored his first chart-topping single with "Small Town U.S.A."

To cap it off, the 25-year-old newcomer was named Billboard's Top New Country Artist of 2009 " something he doesn't take lightly.

"It sticks the cherry on top," Moore said. "I didn't get into this business to win awards or that kind of stuff, but it's pretty cool. It's humbling to know everybody's embraced me this early on in my career."

He first experienced chart success with the song "Back That Thing Up," but it was "Small Town U.S.A." that blew the roof off his career. While he had high hopes for the track, he questioned its stamina on the charts as it competed against George Strait's "Living for the Night" and Oklahoma's own Toby Keith with "American Ride."

"We were up against two of the biggest artists in the last 20 years. It's still pretty unbelievable," Moore said. "It's surreal, to be honest with you. I grew up in a town with 300 people. This kind of thing just is unobtainable. It's extremely humbling to be embraced by country radio and the fans the way that I have been."

The tune not only brought him chart success, but also landed the singer on major tours, including Paisley's current trek.

"(Touring with Brad) is a huge opportunity for us," Moore said. "We were fortunate to get out on a couple of major tours last year kind of before anybody knew who we were. It will be exciting to get out there and play for a lot of folks who are a little more familiar with our music now."

He said he is also excited about playing for those large Paisley crowds in hopes of gaining new fans along the way.

"It gives you the opportunity to grow your fan base," he said. "Aside from that, you learn so much from being out there with the pros. Brad is a class act. I look forward to getting to know him. I can't thank him enough for asking us out."

Moore, who grew up in the tiny town of Poyen, Ark., said that his old stomping grounds are not too far from Oklahoma, so you never know who will show up.

"I'm sure I'll have some family out (at the OKC show)," he said with a laugh. "That will be fun!" Besides the Paisley tour, Moore is anticipating another milestone in his life when his wife, Kate, gives birth to their first child " daughter Ella Cole" next month.

"I'm lucky that I have my wife," he said. "She understands this business and puts up with it. We're out playing music and throwing a party every night for two hours onstage, but that's what you have to do if you want to reach the level that most people want to reach in this business. You've got to eat, sleep and breathe it. You can't half-ass it, because somebody's waiting right behind you to take your spot.

"It's almost like I've been accepted. Obviously, we've still got a whole lot of work to do and to keep doing my career the way we want to build it and to get to the point we want to get to eventually, but we've got a good start.""Alanna Conaway

 
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