Thursday 31 Jul
 
 

Power Pyramid - The God Drums

Power Pyramid doesn’t have much patience for nonsense. That appears to be the takeaway from the Oklahoma City quintet’s last 10 months, which brought The God Drums in September, the Insomnia EP in January and its latest, self-titled effort in July.

07/29/2014 | Comments 0

TJ Mayes - "When Love Comes Down"

’50s era rock ’n’ roll had been long overdue for a rebirth. Thankfully, the stockpile of capable luminaries has not been in short supply over the past few years. 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Boare - "playdatshit"

The world is in the midst of an electronic music renaissance, and you find most of this boon of producers laying claim to the club-friendly, bass-dropping variety, holing up in the the free-flowing world of hip-hop beatmaking or pitching their tent on the out-there, boundary-pushing EDM camp.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Broncho - "Class Historian"

Broncho has never been hurting in the hook department. The success of the trio’s 2011 debut, Can’t Get Past the Lips, was predicated mostly on its ability to marry melodies with kinetic guitar riffs and anarchic energy. Yet we’ve heard nothing to the degree of pure pop catchiness on display in “Class Historian,” the new single from Broncho’s upcoming sophomore album, Just Enough Hip to Be Woman.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Manmade Objects - Monuments

No one wants to be forgotten; everyone wants some sort of legacy, a mark they leave behind as they exit this life for whatever lies beyond.

And for as long as there has been death, there have been monuments — whether austere or understated, abstract or concrete, prominent or tucked away in private — erected by the ones they loved to assure that remembrance, at least for a time.
07/15/2014 | Comments 0
Newsletter
Home · Articles · Music · Music · Blues legend emphasizes music...
Music
 

Blues legend emphasizes music over message


June 14th, 2007

Long recognized as one of America's best country-blues fingerpickers and a scholar of acoustic blues, Paul Geremia has a very clear memory of when music first captured his attention. ...

paulgeremia

Long recognized as one of America's best country-blues fingerpickers and a scholar of acoustic blues, Paul Geremia has a very clear memory of when music first captured his attention.

"My father had an old jazz recording of Louis Armstrong and His Hot Five, which was one of my favorite records when I was a teenager," Geremia said. "It was the horn solo on 'St. Louis Blues' and that was the first time I knowingly got into a blues song."

BACKGROUND
Geremia, whose first instrument was the harmonica, said he has found that in topical or message songs, "sometimes the message becomes more important than the music, and the music suffers as a result of the importance of the message. But if it's an important message, it's worth it."

He soon left college and hit the road permanently. He found paying gigs in coffeehouses and other venues, and appeared as an opening act for early blues legends such as:
" Howlin' Wolf,
" Babe Stovall,
" Yank Rachel,
" Son House,
" and Skip James.

CONTEMPORARIES
John Hammond, an esteemed performer himself, has been quoted in interviews saying that he would drive a thousand miles to see Geremia perform.

"Paul is possibly the greatest living performer of the East Coast and Texas fingerpicking and slide styles, six and 12 strings," Hammond once said. "When Paul plays Leadbelly, you can close your eyes and swear that it's Leadbelly himself." "C.G. Niebank

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
 
 

 

 
 
 
Close
Close
Close