Friday 25 Jul
 
 

Planting the seed

Chelsey Cope’s new band, Elms, is as earthy and native to Oklahoma as the trees that are their namesake. The soulful folk four-piece’s debut EP, Parallel Lines, was recorded at Bell Labs Recording Studio in Norman and is on its way in September. But the band has already given us a tease, with its first single, “Burn,” going live on SoundCloud on July 14.
07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Commercial rock

Center of the Universe Festival featuring Capital Cities, Young The Giant, AWOLNATION & more
Friday-Saturday
Downtown Tulsa 
centeroftheuniversefestival.com 
$35-$50 

07/22/2014 | Comments 0

Mack truckin’

Swizzymack
9 p.m. Friday 
Kamp’s Lounge 
1310 NW 25th St. 
lndrnrs.com 
819-6004 
$10-$15 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Chevy cruisin’

Chevy Woods with Kevin Gates & more
9 p.m. Sunday 
Vibe Night Club 
227 SW 25th St. 
$20-$40 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0

Rock steady

Tesla
7 p.m. Saturday
Frontier City
11501 N. Interstate 35 Service Road 
frontiercity.com
478-2140
Free with park admission 

07/16/2014 | Comments 0
Home · Articles · Reviews · Rock · Eden Sharmaine - Our Fathers
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Eden Sharmaine - Our Fathers


None May 6th, 2010

our-fathers_5-29x5-15cm
What has 14 hands, seven instruments, and one new album with decidedly progressive rock and punk roots?

Answer: Eden Sharmaine, an Oklahoma City six-piece that dropped "Our Fathers" in early April, a disc that sounds like the rock 'n' roll offspring of Muse and Lostprophets. The 10-song record lives in the musical world of arcing electric guitars, weighted vocals with painstakingly constructed lyrics, crazy speed shifts and head-banging beats.

For the music enthusiast on the go who can't listen through an entire album, the opener, "Bonnie and Clyde," makes for a nice example of the disc as a whole. It starts off easy and traipsing, with steady, acoustic strumming paired with front man Evan Crowley's low-slung vocals.
The track takes a sudden swing as crackling electric guitars pair up with understated drums to make a run for the end of the song, crashing against Crowley's vocals. This is the template for much of "Our Fathers," with subtle variations.

"Dr. Strangelove" has heavy, biting, electric guitar work with a strong punk showing, "Cities" dials things back a bit, into a more indie-flavored tone, and "Sending: Receiving" features a tasty guitar solo.

But it's not all a mosh-pit paradise. "Smoke and Mirrors" taps into the group's professed love of blues and more folksy-toned indie rock. The song keeps a simple composition, with guitars dancing a happy little ditty while the drums issue subdued soft-shoe in the background.

In all, the relatively new Eden Sharmaine makes a strong case for itself with the new album and does "Our Fathers" proud. Six of the tracks are available for free download at www.edensharmaine.com. "”Blair Waltman
 
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