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Being Human: Season Two


None October 19th, 2010

the problem was with "True Blood" this past season? Way too damn many characters "” so many that it was difficult to get into any of the several kajillion ongoing story lines.

My allegiance has swung to another monster hit, if only on the other side of the Atlantic: "Being Human." It's on BBC, not HBO, but you can find it now on DVD. It really came into its own in the second season, collected on three discs.

The series follows the close-knit lives of three UK flatmates: vampire Mitchell (Aidan Turner), werewolf George (Russell Tovey) and ghost Annie (Lenora Crichlow). In addition to their beastly qualities (hidden for much of the time), their personalities are markedly different, respectively being cucumber-cool, paranoid-nerdy and manic-depressive.

Season two opens with George finally enjoying a romantic relationship with nurse Nina (button-cute Sinead Keenan), only to see it come tumbling down when she reveals he's accidentally infected her with the curse, thus turning her into a werewolf, too. Annie, usually unseen by humans, takes advantage of her newfound visibility to get a job and perhaps land a beau, while Mitchell continues to tussle with the city's evil vampire underground, which he wishes to dismantle, if only he could figure out how.

Making "Being Human" refreshing is that its scripts don't just concern themselves with the monstrous elements, but "” true to the title "” examine everyday issues relatable to viewers who don't moonlight as bloodsuckers. The English accents take only a few minutes getting used to, and then you're hooked. It's not required that you start with the first season, thanks to a recap, but doing so will increase your enjoyment.

With all three leads turning in winning performances, they comprise a de facto family you'll be glad to be a part of, even if it's only for roughly eight hours. See it now before next year's unnecessary American adaptation gets it wrong. "”Rod Lott

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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