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CD reviews

Admirals - Amidst the Blue

Sometimes it helps to not be very good.

Some of the best albums and artists were born out of happy accidents owed to varying degrees of early suckage — the perfect note or chord for a song found by missing the one you are aiming for, failed mimicry of an idol bearing something entirely new and great instead.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0

Kierston White - Don't Write Love Songs

The Tequila Songbirds have become just as beloved as about any group around these parts. And how could they not?

Featuring a revolving cast of the Sooner State’s most badass female performers, it’s a power hour of some of the best songwriting coming out of central Oklahoma. Sure, they might not technically be family, but they are clearly a band of sisters all the same, bonded by the same brand of whiskey running through their veins.

07/01/2014 | Comments 0

Depth & Current - Dysrhythmia

"Overproduced" is a term thrown around all too indiscreetly nowadays, usually applied when the thing that sticks out about a song or album is how it sounds rather than how it is constructed. Yet some of the most compelling albums ever crafted embodied a certain aesthetic that was just as skillfully and meticulously put together as any Bob Dylan or Miles Davis record — which is to say production is as crucial to our enjoyment of music as much as anything else; it's also the most overlooked.
06/24/2014 | Comments 0

Weak Knees - “IceBevo”

Indie rock has been in a good place as of late. Not caring about being cool is the new cool, and a couple of dudes on guitar, bass and drums can make catchy, earworm songs without being armed to the gills with computer software and vintage synthesizers.
06/17/2014 | Comments 0

Kyle Reid & the Low Swinging Chariots - “When I Was Young”

Every artist should be the star of their own creative life, which makes Kyle Reid’s steps out of the shadows of the many ensembles and supporting roles he has played in Oklahoma bands over the years to front and center on stage feel like a just journey.
06/17/2014 | Comments 0
 

What’s good, KD? Part 2


What does Durantula think about the new Drake record?

By Matt Carney November 17th, 2011
kevindurantheadphones

You might recall my first entry in this series, wherein I tried to guide Oklahoma City Thunder some European basketball club’s starting small forward Kevin Durant toward meaner hip-hop from Pusha T, but judging by his recent Facebook post, “mean” and its many derivatives (“MEEEEAANN,” “MEEANN,” “MEEEEEEEAAAANN,” et. al.) is just a general term for a rap track he likes.

Early Tuesday morning, the reigning NBA scoring champ recommended the new Drake album, “Take Care,” via Twitter, and invited people to discuss it by way of Facebook. It’s a clear endorsement from a guy who’s long been singing the Canadian rapper/R&B crooner’s praises. Recall this ditty from December 2010, less than a month after the release of Kanye West’s “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy”:


It’s easy to see why KD digs Drake. They’re both über-famous youngsters (Drake’s 25, Durant’s 23), coming of age amid worldwide stardom. Drake captures that feeling and shoots it up with some serious swagger on “Under Ground Kings” when he says, “It’s been two years since somebody asked me who I was.”

It’s been even longer than that for the prodigious Durant, who, at 6’9’’ and a freshman starter at Texas, commanded the spotlight in high school and during a brief college layover on his way to being drafted second overall in 2007. Drake’s rise shows a sharper upward trajectory (known first or his work on the teenage show “Degrassi,” he boasts nearly four times Durant’s Twitter followers), most likely because he’s rocketed to international pop star-status.

One Twitter follower asked KD what his favorite tracks from “Take Care” were. He responded with the opening track, “Over My Dead Body” (airy and slow, it’s a sonically curious selection, but a sensible one when you consider the opening lyric), and the more hype “Under Ground Kings,” which is built on wafting notes that vaguely recall the Chicago Bulls’ iconic intro music. The typically smug Drake sandpaper verse “I think I killed everybody in the game last year” is the aforementioned lyric, and if there’s a better description of two-time NBA scoring champ’s offensive prowess, I’d love to hear it.

If there were such a thing as an NBA season right now, every KD highlight video on YouTube would be soundtracked by “Under Ground Kings,” but the way things are going now we’ll probably just have to wait until he formally signs with whatever overseas ball club offers the best deal. Anybody know how much it costs to get the Israeli Basketball Super League package on cable?
 
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11.17.2011 at 02:08 Reply

I love your writing. It reminds me of angels' burps.

 

 
 
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