Thursday 17 Apr
 
 
CD reviews

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0

Rachel Brashear — Revolution

Rachel Brashear’s second EP, Revolution, starts with a kick to the shins.
03/18/2014 | Comments 0
 

Grammy errors


A few Okies and a lot of absurdity dot this year’s nominations.

By Matt Carney December 1st, 2011

Ada-born Blake Shelton; country’s shiniest lady-star Carrie Underwood; and local kiddie-rock stars Sugar Free Allstars (pictured) all got nominated in this year’s round of Grammy nominations, announced today.

OK, so the OKC-based Allstars’ nom comes tangentially, as they contributed the song “Cooperate” to the “All about Bullies ... Big and Small” collection for Cool Beans Music that was nominated for Best Children’s Album, but still cool. Shelton’s and Underwood’s came in the usual country categories.

But yeah, year after year, the Grammy nominees just get increasingly absurd.

This year’s no different. Bon Iver’s up for Record of the Year, Song of the Year and Best New Artist (I suppose you have to sell out mid-size theaters across this country and others in order to be considered a “new artist” these days), competing against the likes of Adele (really?), Bruno Mars, Nicki Minaj and Skrillex.

Fleet Foxes got nominated for Best Folk Album, which is forgivable until you consider that they’re trying to take down Eddie Vedder’s “Ukelele Songs.” Radiohead is in the Best Rock Performance and Best Rock Song categories for “Lotus Flower,” possibly the least rock-like song it’s ever recorded. The band’s bizarre, inventive “The King of Limbs” isn’t even in the Best Rock Album category — it’s nominated for Best Alternative Music Album, ostensibly ousted by Okie natives Kings of Leon’s “Come Around Sundown,” or as I like to call it, “the biggest turd in the whole bowl.”

Wilco is nominated again! I guess once you get nominated and keep making records, you get nominated for life. It’s a travesty that Beyoncé’s best-ever album, “4,” didn’t net anything, and even worse that single “1+1” received no recognition.

And sweet lord, “Sigh No More” was released in October 2009! And yet Mumford & Sons are still up for as many trophies as Bon Iver. I’m writing my congressman.

 
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