Friday 25 Apr
 
 
DVD reviews

Sorcerer

William Friedkin spends a lot of time in his 2013 memoir discussing why Sorcerer didn't click with critics and audiences even though he believes it to be better than his previous film, The Exorcist. Now that Warner Home Video has reissued Sorcerer on Blu-ray, we can see what Friedkin's fuss is all about.
04/23/2014 | Comments 0

Broadchurch: The Complete First Season

Welcome to the coastal resort of Broadchurch, population … oh, who can keep track, what will all the corpses? Yes, Broadchurch is yet another British television procedural involving the search for a murderer in a quaint little town, just like the limited series The Fall and Top of the Lake.
04/23/2014 | Comments 0

Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones

Essentially part five in the ridiculously profitable horror franchise, Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones continues the found-footage conceit of the other films. The difference is instead of the scares taking place in rich white suburbia, they do so in a junky apartment complex on a largely Latino side of Oxnard, Calif.
04/23/2014 | Comments 0

Holy Ghost People

Holy Ghost People examines two sisters whose bond is torn — but by what? After her sibling has been missing for more than a year, Charlotte (Emma Greenwell, TV's Shameless) intends to find out.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

No Holds Barred

RLJ Entertainment's new Blu-ray for No Holds Barred begins with what seems like dozens of trailers for movies starring pro wrestlers from the WWE talent pool. Each flick went direct to home video, but once upon a time — aka 1989 — one had to go to the multiplex to catch such a spectacle.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0
 

I ‘Spy,’ times three


Presenting the R&R DVD Gift Guide, Part 6.

By Rod Lott December 9th, 2011

Today’s holiday home-video gift-giving suggestion is Lionsgate’s release of “Spy Kids Triple Feature” on Blu-ray. Children who liked this summer’s fourth entry in the franchise, with the head-scratching title of “Spy Kids: All the Time in the World,” may be surprised to learn there were three other movies that came before that cinematic pairing of Jessica Alba, Joel McHale and poop jokes.

On three discs, you get all three of those original adventures, all starring Antonio Banderas and Carla Gugino (yum) as the spy parents, and Alexa Vega and Daryl Sabara as their spy progeny, and all written, directed and produced by Robert Rodriguez. 

For my money — and believe me, it seemed like each time my wife birthed a child, there was a new chapter to take them to — the best is 2001’s “Spy Kids.” At the time, it was novel, from the concept to the George Clooney cameo. The next year’s “Spy Kids 2: Island of Lost Dreams,” was a small step down, even if the addition of Steve Buscemi as the bad guy was a step up, but 2003’s “Spy Kids 3: Game Over” was halfway-painful — not just because of Sylvester Stallone’s terrible performance of villainy, but its overall candy-colored scheme and ADHD look. At least at home, you’re not forced to view it in 3-D that did nothing but grant a headache.

In the jump to this high-definition package, the “Spy Kids” trilogy didn’t lose its litany of bonus features from the DVD releases, either. Who knows? Maybe the peeks behind the curtain Rodriguez offers will inspire your own tot to become a DIY director. (If so, just encourage him/her to make more like “Sin City” and less like “Shorts.”)

“Spy Kids Triple Feature” is available now at the suggested retail price of $39.99. —Rod Lott
 
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