Monday 21 Apr
 
 
DVD reviews

Holy Ghost People

Holy Ghost People examines two sisters whose bond is torn — but by what? After her sibling has been missing for more than a year, Charlotte (Emma Greenwell, TV's Shameless) intends to find out.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

No Holds Barred

RLJ Entertainment's new Blu-ray for No Holds Barred begins with what seems like dozens of trailers for movies starring pro wrestlers from the WWE talent pool. Each flick went direct to home video, but once upon a time — aka 1989 — one had to go to the multiplex to catch such a spectacle.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Knights of Badassdom

In 2008, the third act of the guy comedy Role Models used LARPing — live-action role-playing, that is — as a backdrop for our protagonists' lessons learned. Today, Knights of Badassdom extends that half-hour into a full feature, to the point where viewers are left not smiling, but exhausted. 
04/02/2014 | Comments 0

Switched on

Not everything on television has to appeal to mass audiences. In fact, with the further fractioning of viewership thanks to alternatives like Netflix and VOD, more series can afford to become more niche. Here are five examples of shows both past and present — and new to DVD and/or Blu-ray — that encompass some of the more outrageous ideas ever to go beyond boardroom discussion.
04/02/2014 | Comments 0

Confession of Murder

Seventeen years after slaying 10 women and getting away with it, the charismatic serial killer Du-sok (Park Si-hoo) comes clean with a Confession of Murder, in this 2012 South Korean crime thriller. He does so by publishing a book that dishes all the grisly details.
04/02/2014 | Comments 0
 

Let ‘The River’ run


Catch a Renoir classic for free, thanks to OCU.

By Rod Lott January 9th, 2012

Oklahoma City University continues its 30th annual Film Institute series on Jan. 22 with Jean Renoir’s “The River,” based on Rumer Godden’s 1946 novel.

The 1951 drama serves as an unconventional romance, centered on three girls in India who fall in love with the same man, an American solider (Thomas E. Breen) who lost one leg in the war. No less a cinema master than Martin Scorsese deems the Technicolor production as one of “the two most beautiful color films ever made. I watch that film three times a year. Sometimes four.” 

When Scorsese showed to Wes Anderson, the younger director was inspired to make “The Darjeeling Limited.” (If, like me, you found “Darjeeling” to be a blight on Anderson’s otherwise spotless filmography, blame Marty, I guess.)

According to a press release from OCU, “The River” was one of the two most requested films on the evaluation forms from last year’s series.

“The River” screens for free at 2 p.m. Jan. 22 in the Meinders School of Business’ Kerr-McGee Auditorium, 2501 N. Blackwelder.

Still to come are:
• “Children of Heaven,” Feb. 5;
• “The Milk of Sorrow,” Feb. 19; and
• “Sansho the Baliff,” March 4.

For more information, call 208-5472. —Rod Lott
 
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