Wednesday 23 Apr
 
 
CD reviews

IndianGiver - Understudies

There’s a difference between being derivative and being inspired by something, a line a lot of artists can’t seem to find — or at least don’t care to.
04/22/2014 | Comments 0

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0
 

SXSW: Buffalo Lounge: The Rockettops


For The Fray's fans.

By Stephen Carradini March 15th, 2012

The Rockettops play a brand of pop-rock that fans of The Fray would enjoy, as the sound is built on piano-based songwriting, deft bass lines and soaring guitar lines. Vocalist/pianist/acoustic guitarist Jordan Smith's impassioned voice also soars, and it's his vocal melodies that get precedence in these songs. But the rest of the band doesn't slack in its support role; the instrumental interplay is strong, especially for a band in the pop/rock vein.

The band clearly was having a blast, as the members were smiling and laughing throughout. The upbeat atmosphere filled the room, especially when the band ratcheted up the distorted guitars in big crescendos. The Rockettops know how to build and release tension, and that serves their pop-rock songs very well. The tension never feels forced or smarmy, either; the sound feels organic and loose. They can also break it down for emotive moments; they aren't a one-trick pony. Fans of Lifehouse, Goo Goo Dolls, and Matchbox Twenty will perk their ears up at The Rockettops' sound.



Photos by Matt Carney

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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