Thursday 24 Apr
 
 
CD reviews

IndianGiver - Understudies

There’s a difference between being derivative and being inspired by something, a line a lot of artists can’t seem to find — or at least don’t care to.
04/22/2014 | Comments 0

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0
 

Jackson Taylor in 10 points


You'll know all you need to know

By Stephen Carradini February 22nd, 2011
jacksontaylorandthesinner
Here’s all you need to know about outlaw country artist Jackson Taylor:

1. His band is named The Sinners.

2. His album is named “Let the Bad Times Roll.”

3. The tray art features brass knuckles.

4. The album art features a parental advisory sticker, a mess of tattoos and, incorrigibly, a white cowboy hat.

5. The opening stanza of the album, from “Old Henry Rifle,” is: “This ain’t my country anymore / Not the one our granddads killed for / Ut sure don’t feel like the home of the free to me.” Here’s some of the chorus: “I’m tired of choking on the bullshit / And these lies I’ve been horsefed / Yeah, so take your hands out of my pockets / Don’t try to tell me how to live / Well, you’ve taken all you’re gonna take / And I’ve given all I’m gonna give.”

6. The second song (“No Show”) name-checks George Jones in the second line. Whiskey doesn’t make it in till line four. Rascal Flatts gets insulted toward the end of the tune.

7. Each band member has a nickname: The Kid, Sexual Chocolate, Dirty D, Big Texas and Danimal.

8. The road manager gets listed along with the rest of the band (but, it should be noted, without a nickname).

9. Two thank-yous compare men to John Wayne.

10. The band is playing at Graham Central Station tomorrow.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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