Thursday 10 Jul
 
 
CD reviews

Admirals - Amidst the Blue

Sometimes it helps to not be very good.

Some of the best albums and artists were born out of happy accidents owed to varying degrees of early suckage — the perfect note or chord for a song found by missing the one you are aiming for, failed mimicry of an idol bearing something entirely new and great instead.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0

Kierston White - Don't Write Love Songs

The Tequila Songbirds have become just as beloved as about any group around these parts. And how could they not?

Featuring a revolving cast of the Sooner State’s most badass female performers, it’s a power hour of some of the best songwriting coming out of central Oklahoma. Sure, they might not technically be family, but they are clearly a band of sisters all the same, bonded by the same brand of whiskey running through their veins.

07/01/2014 | Comments 0

Depth & Current - Dysrhythmia

"Overproduced" is a term thrown around all too indiscreetly nowadays, usually applied when the thing that sticks out about a song or album is how it sounds rather than how it is constructed. Yet some of the most compelling albums ever crafted embodied a certain aesthetic that was just as skillfully and meticulously put together as any Bob Dylan or Miles Davis record — which is to say production is as crucial to our enjoyment of music as much as anything else; it's also the most overlooked.
06/24/2014 | Comments 0

Weak Knees - “IceBevo”

Indie rock has been in a good place as of late. Not caring about being cool is the new cool, and a couple of dudes on guitar, bass and drums can make catchy, earworm songs without being armed to the gills with computer software and vintage synthesizers.
06/17/2014 | Comments 0

Kyle Reid & the Low Swinging Chariots - “When I Was Young”

Every artist should be the star of their own creative life, which makes Kyle Reid’s steps out of the shadows of the many ensembles and supporting roles he has played in Oklahoma bands over the years to front and center on stage feel like a just journey.
06/17/2014 | Comments 0
 

NMF: Head Cabinets


A real-deal, do-not-miss indie-pop band.

By Stephen Carradini April 29th, 2011
HeadCabinetsHoriz3

Heading back west across Main, I and two friends headed to The Brewhouse to catch Head Cabinets. Having heard nothing about them at all, I was immediately glad that we stopped in. The married duo features a guy on guitar and a girl on cello, with vocals from both. The duo’s acoustic-based songs are similar to old-school Mountain Goats, if John Darnielle and Rachel Ware had the effervescent pop charm of Mates of State and the enthusiasm of Matt and Kim. The considerable rough edges of the guy’s vocals and guitar playing were rounded off by the cello and sweet female vocals, creating an endearing sound that’s hard to dislike.

One of my friends also noted how good their music sounded in The Brewhouse, which was a tribute to the soundman as well as a good band/venue pairing by whoever does that sort of thing for NMF. The cello was a bit quiet occasionally, but that’s the only complaint.

Amidst the clapping, tambourine shaking, singing and smiling, it was easy to miss the lyrics, which were about all sorts of great things: vampires, zombies, religious topics and more. Even though there are only two members, this band is the full package. Head Cabinets is a real-deal, do-not-miss band.

Look forward to more coverage of Thursday (including a triumphant set from The Neighborhood), Friday and Saturday’s NMF events on Monday.   

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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