Sunday 20 Apr
 
 
CD reviews

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0

Rachel Brashear — Revolution

Rachel Brashear’s second EP, Revolution, starts with a kick to the shins.
03/18/2014 | Comments 0
 

NMF: O Fidelis/Depth and Current


Acoustic shows, remixes and Oklahoma tees

By Stephen Carradini May 4th, 2011
OFidelisHoriz2

After Head Cabinets' thoroughly engaging set, my party needed some food. We ordered Bison Witches sandwiches to go, then stopped in at Bigfoot Creative to visit a friend workin' late. We admired their (relatively) new storefront, which was stocked to the hilt with quirky Oklahoma-reppin' tees. I want a Norman one.

Our visual art impulses satiated, we kicked it to Bluebonnet, where O Fidelis was setting up ... and setting up and setting up. Songwriters Brian Gilliland and Laney Coker played a two-song acoustic set to cover the space the technical problems were creating, and it was a neat way to hear them. I'd like to see more of that.  With all the equipment in place, they tore through an abbreviated version of their set, which featured slightly different arrangements of familiar O Fidelis tunes. I'm taking this to mean that their promised release "Bible Promises and Dinosaurs" must be near, what with the revisiting old songs. They brought a ferocious energy to their tunes, as usual, once again reminding me that I just love watching them play. If you haven't seen O Fidelis yet, you're just in the wrong. Do it now.

I'd had to choose between The Gentle Art of Floating and O Fidelis, and as much as I love the aforementioned band, I second-guessed myself when I arrived at Opolis. The small venue was filled with balloons, streamers and a huge light show; I clearly missed something incredible. But, after the apparent party was dismantled, Depth and Current took the stage to rumble through their tunes.

Depth and Current is incredibly well-named, because their low, heavy songs sometimes feel like a heavy wave hitting swimmers. They set up red lights on themselves, casting an eerie glow over everything. Their songs were incredibly tight and impressive in their power. I especially enjoyed the fact that they had learned how to play a remix of one of their tunes.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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