Tuesday 29 Jul
 
 
CD reviews

TJ Mayes - "When Love Comes Down"

’50s era rock ’n’ roll had been long overdue for a rebirth. Thankfully, the stockpile of capable luminaries has not been in short supply over the past few years. 

07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Boare - "playdatshit"

The world is in the midst of an electronic music renaissance, and you find most of this boon of producers laying claim to the club-friendly, bass-dropping variety, holing up in the the free-flowing world of hip-hop beatmaking or pitching their tent on the out-there, boundary-pushing EDM camp.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Broncho - "Class Historian"

Broncho has never been hurting in the hook department. The success of the trio’s 2011 debut, Can’t Get Past the Lips, was predicated mostly on its ability to marry melodies with kinetic guitar riffs and anarchic energy. Yet we’ve heard nothing to the degree of pure pop catchiness on display in “Class Historian,” the new single from Broncho’s upcoming sophomore album, Just Enough Hip to Be Woman.
07/23/2014 | Comments 0

Manmade Objects - Monuments

No one wants to be forgotten; everyone wants some sort of legacy, a mark they leave behind as they exit this life for whatever lies beyond.

And for as long as there has been death, there have been monuments — whether austere or understated, abstract or concrete, prominent or tucked away in private — erected by the ones they loved to assure that remembrance, at least for a time.
07/15/2014 | Comments 0

Admirals - Amidst the Blue

Sometimes it helps to not be very good.

Some of the best albums and artists were born out of happy accidents owed to varying degrees of early suckage — the perfect note or chord for a song found by missing the one you are aiming for, failed mimicry of an idol bearing something entirely new and great instead.

07/09/2014 | Comments 0
 

NMF: Student Film/The Neighborhood


Two Oklahoma City greats tear it up

By Stephen Carradini May 5th, 2011
StudentFilmVertical

For me, Student Film is the Oklahoma indie-rock OG. When I was just getting into Oklahoma City music in 2006, Student Film had already kicking it for years. The band started before The Neighborhood did, kept playing after they broke up and was still performing by the time that Philip Rice and company reunited (which happens in several paragraphs). If Student Film's shows have a little bit of Charlie Daniels-esque "That's how you do it, son" air about them, well, they earned it. 

And they keep earning it, by churning out complex, frantic, erratic rock. Their NMF set at Opolis caused me to keep looking back and forth between members to determine who was making what noise. The blaring keys and thrashy bass held most of my interest, as they dominated the sound. These aren't simple songs in any universe; the songwriting and arrangement is head-spinning. That they can perform it live with such panache is the other half of the reason they're the OG. Student Film isn't for everyone, as the tunes can occasionally err on the side of heady noise, but the best moments toward the back of their set were thoroughly inclusive. "Witchitawesome" set, guys; just writing about it is causing my computer to freak out (seriously).

This is what it was like.

And then, lo and behold, The Neighborhood. In the aforementioned beginnings of my time in Oklahoma City music, The Neighborhood was the first band I truly loved. Their passionate songs struck a chord in me that hadn't been hit before by tunes of the pop/rock persuasion (I still cringe at calling them pop/rock because the tunes mean so much more than most "pop" ditties). Pretty much everything I've heard from them has been golden. When they broke up, it was a sad, sad day.

It was, then, with great anticipation that I awaited this set. People flew and drove in from out of state to be at this concert. I saw people I hadn't seen in years. This was, by my humble reckoning, an "I was there" type of moment. The Neighborhood did not disappoint.

After setting up the stage in their particular idiom (drums stage left, facing the band), they kicked off the set with "Your Longest Day," which whipped everyone into a dancing/moshing frenzy that only let up during their two acoustic tunes. The Neighborhood's energy fed through the audience and back to the band, resulting in one of the most awe-inspiring sets I've witnessed in years. It was easily the best performance I saw at Norman Music Festival.

This is what it felt like.

The band tore through favorites off "Our Voices Choked With Fireworks" ("Stand Up, Chin Up, and Say," "Slingshots and Cannons") as well as unreleased ragers like "What? Hey!" and a song that probably isn't called "In the Lawn" but should be. The four-piece showed negligible signs of rust, missing only a single note in a bass solo the during opener. The rest of the set was flawless, either in truth or in audience perception. For the group to be spot-on after three years of not playing together is absolutely incredible. 

Everyone sang, danced and sweated. No one had reason to be disappointed, unless they had held out hope for "The Television Set" — but that's no party song. And that's what The Neighborhood brought: a huge party. Good news for those who missed it: I've been told there will be more of these concerts going down. Hallelujah.

 
  • Currently 3.5/5 Stars.
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