Wednesday 16 Apr
 
 
CD reviews

Dustin Prinz - Eleven

Few musicians take the time to master their instrument in the way that Oklahoma City singer-songwriter Dustin Prinz has; he’s a guitar virtuoso in every sense of the word, and Eleven gives him the chance to show just how far he can push that skill.
04/15/2014 | Comments 0

Horse Thief – Fear in Bliss

Listening to Horse Thief’s previous release — the haphazardly melodramatic Grow Deep, Grow Wild — felt like a chore. Whatever potential the Oklahoma City folk-pop act demonstrated on the EP was obscured behind a formulaic, contrived and ultimately hollow cloud. But it at least offered a glimmer of promise for a band consisting of, frankly, five pretty talented dudes. Critics saw it; the band’s management saw it; its current label, Bella Union, saw it; and its increasingly fervid fan base saw it.
04/08/2014 | Comments 0

Colourmusic — May You Marry Rich

There’s always a sense of danger when debuting songs in a live setting and playing them well. Without having heard the studio versions, expectations are set according to the live incarnations. But capturing the breadth of free-flowing atmosphere and sheer volume on a disc, vinyl or digital file isn’t the easiest thing to do, especially for a band as vociferous as Colourmusic.
04/01/2014 | Comments 0

Em and the MotherSuperiors — Churches into Theaters

As titles go, Churches into Theaters is an apt descriptor for the debut album from Oklahoma City rockers Em and the MotherSuperiors. It’s a reverential record, one that shares the gospel of classic rock, blues and soul but embraces the need to refashion it for modern times, channeling The Dead Weather, Grace Potter and Cage the Elephant along the way.
03/25/2014 | Comments 0

Rachel Brashear — Revolution

Rachel Brashear’s second EP, Revolution, starts with a kick to the shins.
03/18/2014 | Comments 0
 

A little metro music


Releases in short from around the area

By Stephen Carradini June 16th, 2011
uglysuitawwshucks

OKC’s defunct indie heroes The Uglysuit released their long-awaited final LP Tuesday. “Awwww, Shucks” is available via iTunes and eMusic, with streaming listening on Bandcamp. Read more about the band’s last hurrah here.



It’s a daunting task to take on a whole album of Jimi Hendrix tunes, but OKC blues/rock guitarist Phil Brown has done just that with “The Jimi Project.” The 12-song album collects faithful renditions of well-known cuts (“Voodoo Child,” “Are You Experienced?”) and lesser-known tunes (“Manic Depression,” “One Rainy Wish”), while Brown’s soulful vocals put a bit of a different spin on the tunes. Catch him as leader of the Phil Brown Trio from 7-8:30 p.m. Sunday as part of the 2011 Devon Energy Sunday Twilight Concert Series (wow, that’s a mouthful) on the Grand Lawn of the Myriad Botanical Gardens.

Normanite Two Suns, whose self-titled EP recently got some Gazette ink, has released two tracks from his July 11 EP, “Self-Addressed.” His artsy electronic pop is infused with a bit more muscle and confidence, showing that Two Suns could have some high highs if he keeps pursuing this growth.




Max Ridgway, longtime instructor of guitar at Northwestern Oklahoma State University, recently released “A Little Night Music,” an eight-track affair of originals and covers. The collection opens with “BB Blues” by Larry Coryell, who will headline next Friday’s second night of the Jazz in June festival in Norman. The pleasing collection of jazz, blues and rock includes versions of Bill Withers’ “Ain’t No Sunshine” and The Beatles’ “Come Together” and “Help!” The latter Lennon/McCartney tune is heavily modified in a gravelly blues style, while the former is relatively unchanged. The originals show a strong sense of melody, and should be of interest to both blues and jazz fans.

Fans of the Zac Brown Band’s country/Southern rock/pop amalgam should snap up the self-titled album from Dead Man’s Bluff. Their most notable songs are more aggressive than the melodic pop version of country that’s currently dominating the radio (“The Line,” “What You Did”), but the band also can lighten up and have fun musically (“This Song,” “Better Luck,” “Oklahoma Blues”). The lyrics stay pretty downtrodden, however, which is a downside. —Stephen Carradini
 
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