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Day of the Dead

Eat it up.


Horror

Patrick Crain
With the exception of George Lucas’s Star Wars movies, few franchises that laid their foundation on the big screen were as culturally significant as George A. Romero’s Dead films. Everything about our conception of zombies derive from Romero’s creations. Before Night of the Living Dead — Romero’s stark, groundbreaking drive-in shocker from 1968 — zombies were barely in the public’s collective wheelhouse. Usually featured as trance-like beings who were used as slave labor, zombies were more tools of an insidious puppet master than a force unto themselves. Heck, before Night of the Living Dead, the term “undead” was mostly used to describe vampires.
 
Friday, October 25, 2013

Seconds

Might as well get thirds.


Thriller

Patrick Crain
Director John Frankenheimer camps in a unique place in the story of American film. Too young to be active during Hollywood’s last great period before it fell into stagnancy but too old to be considered part of the hot-shot New American Cinema movement, Frankenheimer instead navigated the Cold War cinema of the early sixties, crafting some of his best known work like The Manchurian Candidate and Birdman of Alcatraz. And for all of the accolades heaped upon those movies, for my money, 1966’s Seconds remains his crowning achievement.
 
Tuesday, September 17, 2013

The Lords of Salem

Zombie Nation!


Horror

Patrick Crain
To put it politely, the cinema of Rob Zombie is fairly polarizing. Some folks love him, some folks hate him, and there just aren’t a whole lot of people in the middle. Over the course of 10 years, he has made six feature films and one of the fake trailers for the Rodriguez/Tarantino experiment, Grindhouse. Chances are, you either think all of his films are good or, at least, have some kind of merit or are just revolted by the notion that anyone allows him near a camera. The Lords of Salem is unlikely to make anyone jump from his or her respective camp, but it’s also his best film to date and an amazing piece of contemporary horror.
 
Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Heavy Traffic

It's a Heavy cartoon.


Comedy

Patrick Crain

Ah, the early days of video stores. Most every city, burg and/or township had that one glorious store with one copy of everything. OKC had Kaleidoscope Video Stores; Mid-Del had Bob’s Video; and in the dark regions of Bob’s Video sat the “adult” movies which were basically comprised of Paul Morrissey’s Flesh For Frankenstein and Blood For Dracula and Ralph Bakshi’s two X-rated cartoons, Fritz the Cat and Heavy Traffic. Oh, how I wanted to see all these movies! Of course, as an eleven-year-old, I never had the gumption to try to rent any of them out of fear I would be ejected from the store and banned for life.

 
Tuesday, August 27, 2013

A Boy and His Dog

Overlooked in its time, the cult classic is unearthed and given the Blu-ray treatment. Don Johnson in hi-fi!


Sci-Fi

Patrick Crain
There is something truly remarkable about A Boy and His Dog: the ability to remain under the radar despite all its cultural touchstones, owing a debt of gratitude to L.Q. Jones’s adaptation of Harlan Ellison’s novella.
 
Monday, August 19, 2013

Lend a little

A unique book-sharing program for neighborhoods is on its way to OKC.


Features

Patrick Crain
Technology has grown so that the entertainment-delivery systems of past decades seem wholly antiquated.
 
Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Painting the town Greg

Longtime local artist Greg Burns keeps up with the ever-changing city.


Visual Arts

Patrick Crain
Somewhere there exists a run of prints of a one-off Greg Burns piece containing a small detail that makes it rare. At first blush, it looks familiar enough: a rendering of the iconic Townley’s milk-bottle grocery store on Classen Boulevard.
 
Wednesday, September 26, 2012
 
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