Thursday 31 Jul
 
 

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: Academy Award

Inside Job

Your blood will boil.


Documentary

Rod Lott
Earlier this week, a Congressional inquiry released a report on the 2008 financial crisis, calling it “avoidable” and pointing blame at several causes.
 
Friday, January 28, 2011

Be their guest

Belle, the Beast and the whole ensemble bring their ‘tale as old as time’ to the Civic Center.


Performing Arts

Jenny Coon Peterson
7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday; 3 and 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday
Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker
OKCCivicCenter.com, 297-2264
Sold out
 
Wednesday, February 16, 2011

One Week

An affecting, offbeat drama


Drama

Rod Lott
Not based on the Barenaked Ladies song, “One Week” begins with young Ben Tyler (Joshua Jackson and his perpetual 5 o'clock shadow) being told he has stage IV cancer of the blood, liver and lymph nodes, and thus, little time left to live.
 
Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Blue Valentine

Michelle Williams delivers a dead-on-perfect performance


Drama

Rod Lott
While long impressive on the big screen, from “The Station Agent” to “Brokeback Mountain,” Michelle Williams does her best work yet in “Blue Valentine,” the fractured love story that earned her a well-deserved Academy Award nomination for Best Actress, but was more deserved to Natalie Portman in "Black Swan."
 
Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Doc this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at City Arts Center, 3000 General Pershing, director Scott Hamilton Kennedy leads a master class in independent documentary production for $50.

 
Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Switched on

Tulsa-lensed drama ‘The Lamp’ sets Sept. 15 benefit screening.

Shot in Oklahoma, “The Lamp” soon can be seen in Oklahoma. At 7 p.m. Sept. 15, the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oklahoma hosts a special screening of the film at the Mabee Center, 7777 S. Lewis in Tulsa.

With a cast that includes Academy Award winner Louis Gossett Jr., the inspirational movie is about a broken man fighting to keep his marriage and life together after the death of their only child. Scheduled to appear at the benefit screening are director Tracy J. Trost and co-producer Jim Stovall, the Tulsa businessman who wrote the book on which the film is based.

All proceeds will benefit Make-A-Wish. For ticket information, call 918-495-6000. —Rod Lott
by Rod Lott 08.25.2011 2 years ago
at 08:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

R&R Q&A with Michael Shannon

The ‘Boardwalk Empire’ actor talks shop and Superman, which gives him ‘the shivers.’

Michael Shannon made his motion-picture debut alongside Bill Murray in “Groundhog Day,” but his career really didn’t take off until 2008, when his supporting performance as the mentally unstable acquaintance of Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet in “Revolutionary Road” was honored with an Academy Award nomination.

The roles have grown in size ever since, from “Jonah Hex” to two films with the legendarily idiosyncratic director Werner Herzog in “Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans” and “My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done.” The most notable, however, has been his good-guy role as Agent Nelson Van Alden on HBO’s Emmy-winning “Boardwalk Empire.”

Earlier this week, Shannon talked to Gazette about “Boardwalk,” now airing its second season, and the project that threatens to take his star into the stratosphere: the Superman reboot in which he plays the Man of Steel’s Kryptonian nemesis, General Zod.

R&R: “Boardwalk Empire” is really the first time you've worked on a TV series other than a guest shot. Does it feel completely different than being on a movie set or is the level of quality so high that there's no difference?

Shannon: The structure of it's very different. I mean, when you do a movie, you get one script —  unless there are going to be sequels or something — but you get the one script and it has a beginning, middle and an end, and you go shoot it and that's that.

But this is ... it's not like you're telling a story. It's like you're creating a whole other world, you know, that moves in every direction. And the story just keeps getting more and more twisted and complicated. I walk away from the end of the season and I have absolutely no idea what to expect. It's very mysterious.

R&R: This is sort of your time right now. I mean, “Boardwalk” is airing, “Take Shelter” is out, “13” is finally coming out on DVD. It's like Michael Shannon week! Did you ever think you would be at this point? I mean, you've worked a long time, but it's only since “Revolutionary Road” that the industry as a whole took notice.


Shannon:
I've always been happy just to be working, you know. It doesn't really matter for me how many people are familiar with my name or my picture or whatever. I enjoyed living in Chicago and doing plays for little or no money. And I never actually thought that I would leave Chicago originally. I wasn't one of these people that had a plan to pack up the van and drive out to Hollywood. I didn't want to. I knew other people that did that and a lot of them wound up kind of unhappy, so it kind of frightened me.

So the fact that I got to ... I guess to get to this point kind of surreptitiously is really incredibly fortunate for me, because I kind of got this without even necessarily chasing after it. I just kept doing work that I believed in and it kind of led me to this place, but I'm always very reticent to buy into any of the hype, because it goes away in the blink of any eye, you know. And you make one wrong move, you can find yourself back in obscurity.

But it's not something I'm really keeping a lot of attention to. I'm not looking at my star meter or something, you know, how many people are talking about me or something. I just keep working on things I like and hope for the best, hope people enjoy them.

R&R: Then are you prepared for the onslaught with “Man of Steel”? The press on that is going to be outrageous.

Shannon: Honestly, no. I'm not prepared for that in any way, shape or form. It gives me shivers. I'll do the best I can, but ... it's funny because it used to just be that you do the work and the work just spoke for itself.


R&R:
Right.

Shannon: But when you get on a project like that, obviously, it's almost like half the job is being a cheerleader for the team. You got to go around, stirring up the pot, as it were. But it's hard to do that when they tell you, "Oh, and by the way, you can't say anything about it. And the only thing you should say is, “It's really great. It's really great. I'm having such a great time and everybody's great.” That gets a little frustrating after a while.

I find it kind of funny actually, because if I didn't tell you anything about Superman, but I asked you, “Tell me what happens in Superman,” I bet you could probably tell me the whole story. I mean, it's kind of like saying, “I'm not supposed to talk about the Pledge of Allegiance.” It's kind of silly.

R&R: Has Agent Nelson Van Alden become a favorite character of yours because you've worked with him so long or do you have another that stands out for you more?

Shannon: Well, I get pretty attached to the majority of the characters I play. I mean, I can't help myself, but the thing with Van Alden is, I always look forward to seeing what's going to be next, and that's a very different experience than anything else I've done.

But I do have a lot of sympathy for him. I think Van Alden has a very hard life and I feel for him. And a lot of people will stop me and say, “Oh, I watch ‘Boardwalk Empire.’ I love the show, you're good on it, but I hate your character. He's such as asshole." It’s a little upsetting, so I say, "Why do you think he's a bad guy?" I mean, is it so hard to understand what happened to him or is he too opaque or something?

Because when I look at him, he makes me really sad. He tried really hard to do the right thing and he failed, and then he kind of went off the tracks. But, yes, the character seems to illicit some really negative feelings from people, which makes me a little defensive sometimes.

R&R: What’s next for you?

Shannon: Let's see, I've got the two films out right now, “Take Shelter” and “Machine Gun Preacher,” and “Take Shelter,” I'm really excited about people seeing that, because I think it's pretty good. “Machine Gun Preacher” is all right, too.

Let's see, I did a movie called “Premium Rush” with Joseph Gordon-Levitt, which I think is coming out next summer. But right now, I'm just shooting “Man of Steel” all the way up until February, and then (season three of) “Boardwalk Empire” starts in February, so there's not a lot of downtime there. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 10.28.2011 2 years ago
at 12:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Brief encounters

In honor of this year’s batch of Oscar-nominated shorts showing at Oklahoma City Museum of Art, we bring you short reviews of each.


Features

Rod Lott
Academy Award-Nominated Animated Short Films
5:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday

Academy Award-Nominated Live-Action Short Films
8 p.m. Friday-Saturday
Oklahoma City Museum of Art
415 Couch
okcmoa.com
236-3100
$5-$8
 
Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Annie Hall

Love is too weak a word.


Comedy

Phil Bacharach
What’s there to say about Annie Hall? It’s an American classic, arguably Woody Allen’s finest film and perhaps one of the best romantic comedies of all time. The fact that it served as a turning point for Allen from full-bore comedies to more ambitious (if just as funny) stuff can make it easy to take for granted.
 
Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Film this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Last year’s most popular 3-D documentary about dance, Pina, tiptoes into the Oklahoma City Museum of Art, 415 Couch, for screenings at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, 5:30 and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday.
 
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
 
Close
Close
Close