Friday 25 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: Avenged Sevenfold

The great outdoors

The Zoo and Frontier City provide outdoor tunes


Music

Rod Lott
One of the best things about spring? Looking forward to summer’s outdoor concerts.
 
Tuesday, April 5, 2011
Kite Flying Robot photo0755

Five alive

Local musicians are everywhere tonight

I’m no fan of cloning, but only because it doesn’t actually do what I want it to do. When I say, “I wish I could clone myself,” I really mean that I wish I could replicate/duplicate myself. Bill Watterson, genius creator of Calvin and Hobbes, understood this and created some of the best strips of the best comic series ever about it (scroll down to the sixth strip). 

The reason I need a replicator tonight is that there are five local concerts I want to attend tonight. I need duplicates.

The one I’m going to be hitting for sure is the one I’ve been looking forward to for weeks/months: Brine Webb and The Nghiems’ double-CD release show in Norman. I’ve been stuck on Webb’s gripping tunes for weeks now, and I’m thoroughly excited to see them played live. Also, he and The Nghiems are planning to accommodate Thunder fans by having The Nghiems play during halftime, and Webb play after the fourth quarter. As a pretty rabid Thunder fan, I’m stoked about this.

The one I’m most depressed about missing is Feathered Rabbit, Junebug Spade and The Gentle Art of Floating at Belle Isle Brewery. Both Feathered Rabbit and The Gentle Art of Floating are on my to-see list — the former because it’s a new Kyle Mayfield (O Fidelis, Junebug Spade, Larry Chin, everyone else in Oklahoma City) project, and the latter because they throw parties, not shows. Alas, I will have to wait yet again.

If the Webb show gets done early, I’ll traipse my way over to Opolis, where Kite Flying Robot, Chrome Pony and Guardant will be throwing an end-of-school dance party. I have been known to dance wildly at Opolis.

Before all this started getting crazy, I had planned on going seeing Ryan Lawson, Ali Harter and O Fidelis at Bad Granny’s Bazaar, as all three are OKS faves. If you like acoustic country/folk, this is your show; these are three of the best in the metro at it, and rare is the show where they all play together.

And I just heard that Anty Shanty, 318 Main Street in Norman, will be hosting Skating Polly, Luna Moth and Shitty/Awesome as part of Second Friday Art Walk. I still haven’t been to a show here yet, despite my desire. Must everyone play on the same night?!

As for non-local artists, Jamey Johnson will be stopping at Diamond Ballroom for those who are into straight-up country. It doesn’t get earthier than Johnson these days, so if that’s your bag, this is your gig. Red-dirt Austinite Brandon Jenkins will play Joy’s Palace, 300 E. Main Street in Norman, also as part of Art Walk. Finally, Avenged Sevenfold ,Three Days Grace and Bullet for My Valentine will be rocking faces off at Zoo Amphitheatre.

Saturday is less stacked, but still a difficult choice, as The City Lives’ final show is at The Conservatory; The Boom Bang, Copperheads and Purple Church make ears bleed at Opolis; and new band Bona Fide Villains (ex-Sweetwater) play Sauced.

Don’t ever let ‘em ever tell you this town had nothin’ for ya.

by Stephen Carradini 05.13.2011 3 years ago
at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
wafite

Neither here nor there

Three CDs that are marginally related to OKC

The music the Gazette receives falls mostly into three categories: local, locally connected and national. Metro music runs in the paper, while national releases generally are reviewed online. The middle category often falls through the cracks. Not today, however.  

W.A. Fite lives in Dallas, but he’s signed to the Dallas/OKC record label Hand Drawn Records. His “Poisoning the Medicine Tree” is an album of gritty electronic pop with a modern-rock singer over it. He follows a less-traveled path through electronic music: This is not the subtle indie pop of The Postal Service, the sunshiny pop of Owl City, or dance-oriented electro. This is forceful, rock-oriented, electronic music that sort of sounds like the pseudo-electronic experiments of Bush (“Glycerine”), thanks to both the vocals and the song structures. “Beating Thomas Best” and “Jack” are immediate standouts, while the mellower “Carney’s Lake” kicks off the quieter, more experimental back half. “That Ain’t the Way” is a piano rumination, showing his diversity.

Tulsa modern rock band Burn Halo’s latest, “Up from the Ashes,” is not bad, as far as modern rock goes. The strict constraints of the genre still apply, but the production tones down the shrieking treble that makes other releases in the genre so earsplitting. The resulting mix is heavy on low-end of everything: Even the snares sound like almost like toms. The acoustic intro to “Threw It All Away” results in a better-than-average power ballad. (To the naysayers: Yes, it’s still a power ballad.) The band has toured with Avenged Sevenfold, Buckcherry, Papa Roach and Halestorm. The album drops June 28.

Hailing from Okemah, Shawna Russell’s hot-country sound would fit in neatly with now-Okie Miranda Lambert and Taylor Swift, if Swift had a bit more muscular voice. Russell has a strong, mid-range one, and she uses it to the fullest on her self-titled, sophomore debut, which was recorded in OKC and Nashville. The album won’t convert any non-country fans, but Twister listeners will find much to love in her midtempo tunes.  



While you’re here, grab these free MP3s:

1. Hearts” — I Break Horses. You know that dream where you’re flying above the ocean and you’re awestruck instead of terrified?
2. Constellating” — James and Evander. The first band I’ve heard that lives up to a Postal Service comparison, because it has its own spin.
3. The First Time I Saw Jupiter” — Fall on Your Sword. Exactly the type of grounded, arresting electronic music I would expect from a former member of LCD Soundsystem.
4. “World’s Entire” — Kay Kay and His Weathered Underground. I’ve often wondered what “Pet Sounds” would sound like if Brian Wilson grew up now.
5. “Everything Must Spin” — Ryan Driver. Including your head, when you hear this dizzying acoustic track.
by Stephen Carradini 06.13.2011 3 years ago
at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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