Tuesday 29 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: Bandcamp
Promo 2

World premiere: Purple Church’s ‘Twin Lakes’

And you can download it, too!

Purple Church’s heavy, psychedelic sound came to my attention last year upon the release of two EPs.

The Oklahoma City-based band is dropping another EP on Feb. 22, entitled “Twin Lakes.” The group has been so gracious as to let us host the world premiere of the title track from the EP on this very blog. It’s available for download right here:

"Twin Lakes" — Purple Church

This track is decidedly less heavy and less psychedelic than previous works, moving toward more standard rock structures. There are still heavy bits and psychedelic bits, but on the whole, “Twin Lakes” is a less freaked-out affair than “Woodsporn” or “Hayseed.” I like the more prominent role of the vocals, as well as the sweet riffing that closes out the song. Look for the full three-song EP to drop Feb. 22 on their Bandcamp page.

by Stephen Carradini 02.11.2011 3 years ago
at 01:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
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OKS --> SXSW!

It’s time to kick out the jamz

Change the oil, pack the car and cue up the playlist, because it’s time to head down to Austin for Music Christmas South by Southwest. I’ll be down there Tuesday night all the way to the end in the wee hours of Sunday morning. Here’s an audio and video approximation of how excited I am.

You can expect loads of SXSW coverage here at the OKSee blog. I’ll be spending Tuesday, Wednesday and the first half of Thursday covering the Oklahoma Film and Music Office’s The Buffalo Lounge. The fantastic people up at OF&MO have put together a lineup of 28 Oklahoma bands that I’m really excited to see. Expect photos, audio clips (of talking — music clips from my teeny recorder would sound like this), interviews, reviews, news bits, the whole nine yards. It’s gonna be a blast.

I’ll also be tweeting up a storm at twitter.com/okgazette.

From 6 p.m. Thursday onward, I’ll be kicking it all over Austin, trying to catch the best and brightest new music the smorgasbord has to offer. I have several priorities (one of Braids9 shows, Typhoon, Matt and Kim, Rocky Business, Givers), but I’ll be all over the place, reporting it as I hit it. I may even drink coffee to get me through this. My stimulant of choice is Red Bull, but at 10:30 a.m. Friday when I’m trying to get to a Chris Bathgate show at 11, I may have to call in the big guns.

Here’s a whole bunch of SXSW info for those going/lusting:
Official site
Last.FM band aid, which will run your Last.FM account against the listings to tell you who you should see, which will make attendees drool and lusters weep
Guardian complete band listing, with vids, streams, bios and more on each
Bandcamp visualizer – about a fourth of the bands have music downloadable/streaming/available for purchase here
Free iTunes playlist

Thanks to Pitchfork for alerting me to a couple of these links.

photo Braids

by Stephen Carradini 03.11.2011 3 years ago
at 02:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Internet, meet Clio

Streaming music may never be the same

While I was in Austin, Texas, for South by Southwest, I was able to talk with Greg Wilder and Alison Conard of Orpheus Media Research. They are touting a service with an April launch called Clio that they feel will revolutionize music listening (its predecessor, Myna, is live now). It’s a computer program that listens to music and categorizes it by its qualities. Doesn’t sound that cool? Wait for it.

Ever heard of the Music Genome Project?

It’s the thing that powers Pandora: dozens and dozens of people sitting around, listening to music, and categorizing it by approximately 400 unique qualities. Each song in MGP can take up to 20 minutes to be organized. Because of this laborious process, Pandora has only about 800,000 tunes in its catalog.

Clio automates the process.
 
“The analysis time that the computer takes to actually listen to a piece of music is around one to two seconds,” said Wilder, founder and chief science officer.

A three-to-five minute pop track takes literally the length of a snap to process. This means it categorizes tens of millions of tracks at a time.

Repeat: tens of millions of tracks at a time.

Um, wow.

What does this mean? Well, they want to partner with existing services and use Clio to power everything. And by everything, I mean any way that people find music: iTunes Genius, Rhapsody, Amazon, MOG, Pandora and Last.fm are all entities who could benefit from this.

The company is already working in television and movie music, as the screen often demands a song with a very specific mood. If the music director of a production company has a track with the right mood in mind, he or she can plug it into Clio, which will match it to other songs that sound like it in the Vanacore music library, a current partner of Clio. The program then produces a playlist of tracks that sound similar and are available for use.

But Clio’s library isn’t going to only hold production music, or even major-label music. Clio was started by two indie musicians, and they want to help out independent artists. They have plans to partner with companies like ReverbNation and Bandcamp to make large quantities of indie music accessible to Clio, too. That means when the music director puts in one tune he likes — say, a number from post-rock instrumental act Maserati — it will spit out an entire suggested soundtrack — perhaps something by Explosions in the Sky, something by The Non (pictured).  

“That will help independent artists stand right next to established artists based on the quality of their music,” Wilder said.

People who haven’t played a single show could be queued up over U2, as long as their contribution sounds more like the chosen starting song than “Where the Streets Have No Name.” When Clio powers your listening portal of choice, you’ll easily be able to find new things you actually want to hear.

With the processing power that Clio has (remember: tens of millions of songs at a time), it is not an overstatement when the founders compare their endeavor to a musical Google. Clio has the ability to categorize almost every piece of music ever written and make it streamable to you.

Again, wow.

Streaming music may never be the same.

___

While you’re here, grab these MP3s:

“Lower Away (Unplugged)” — Sunshine Factory. Surprisingly mellow and graceful piano piece.
“Big Sick” — Big Pauper. I guess you don’t need guitars for druggy psych anymore.
“How Does It Feel to Be in Love?” — The Bynars. Probably something like this power-pop gleefest.

by Stephen Carradini 03.25.2011 3 years ago
at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
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The future is Clio

Like Pandora, but infinitely more awesome

Ever since I met the founders of Clio at South by Southwest, I’ve been eagerly anticipating their product’s impact on the music scene. Their idea automates and expands the Pandora music-matching process, making music discovery both more agile and more far-reaching. Their goal is every piece of music ever written, at your fingertips. I am so behind this idea.

Since SXSW, they’ve been making strides. Their first partner, music production library APM, was announced today. Filmmakers will be able to find music for their scores much easier, thanks to Clio’s advanced matching system, which takes into account everything from tempo, instrumentation and melody to seemingly intangible elements like “the groove.”

Greg Wilder and Alison Conard (the idea people behind Clio) are meeting with bigwigs of the consumer-facing music discovery products soon, hopefully bringing their technology to the masses, albeit invisibly. If Clio works properly, no one really knows it’s there – listeners just somehow feel that the service they’re using today is a ton better than it was yesterday at figuring out what they actually want to listen to.

I was sent some exclusive demos of the product that have me pretty stoked. The first demo used APM’s music catalog; while it was really cool to hear rock seamlessly morph into bossa nova in just a few short steps, it was mainly a geek-out thing. I’m that guy who makes sure the beginning and endings of songs fade into each other on mixes, so matching internal rhythm to internal rhythm through genre is immensely appealing to me. The software recognizes so much information that you can make almost perfect-transition mixes, in addition to mixes that don’t change moods one single inch.

The second set of demos was even more revealing, as it was a set of clips made by Clio that showed various popular songs being discovered via other pop songs. The set that started with Green Day’s “When I Come Around” wasn’t eye-popping on the surface (how hard is it to match up Blink-182 and Green Day?), but have you ever noticed how closely the guitar tone of “Always” resembles “When I Come Around”? Or of “Short Brown Hair” by Everclear? Then it’s straight into “Favours for Favours” by The Futureheads, which I probably wouldn’t have included in this list, but fits in perfectly, sound-wise and rhythm-wise.

That’s the great thing about Clio: It doesn’t care about demographics. Sure, Blink and Green Day sound similar and are in the same scene. But Futureheads are in a completely different scene, but sound similar. A teenage pop-punker could get turned on to indie rock via this list and connections across time and “scene.”

Other playlists do the same for other genres, but here’s the skinny: Clio works. Once a major player or two representing true independents (Bandcamp? Please please please please?) is funneled into Clio, there’s literally nothing stopping U2 fans from hearing your music if your band sounds like U2. That is a major boon for independent bands and music lovers.

Stay tuned for more info from the Clio guys; it will be big stuff. Clio will change the way people discover music, and you may not even know that it’s doing so.

by Stephen Carradini 07.15.2011 3 years ago
at 08:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Enid’s Black Canyon release debut album on Bandcamp

‘Battlefield Darlins’ features OKC singer Sherree Chamberlain

Anybody in Oklahoma City with their ears in even remote proximity to the ground have been hearing boot-stomping and hand-clapping the last few months.

The alt-country/folk-rock sounds are coming this way from Enid songwriter Jake Morisse, who starred in Okie videographer/photographer Nathan Poppe’s debut film, “Black Canyon’s Crossroads for the Restless.” After a bit of tinkering with the band’s sound, lineup and direction, Morisse recorded and released the debut on Bandcamp, which features Enid instrumental whiz and former Mayola frontman Riley Jantzen and Normanite Tyler Hopkins.

But most notable is Sherree Chamberlain’s contribution to the record; a graceful, soul-singing depiction of the female in the album’s Civil War-era romance. Expect a review in the Aug. 3 edition of the Oklahoma Gazette. But for now, you should definitely head over to the band’s Bandcamp page and download the album. Below is the trailer to the aforementioned film which —in the interest of full disclosure— I helped make. Enjoy.


by Matt Carney 07.22.2011 3 years ago
at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Soundcheck: Klipspringer, 'The Trouble with Sebastian'

Sophomoric humor and guitar rock? Yes, please.


Music

Matt Carney
Norman’s Klipspringer might just be the most lyrically consistent band in the history of music in this state.
 
Wednesday, August 10, 2011

MPFree: Upcoming indie bands and locals aplenty!

Doing the legwork so you don't have to.

It’s been a slow couple of months for interesting new music from established acts, be they indie or mainstream. Other than Kanye and Jay-Z’s epic collaboration on “Watch the Throne,” we haven’t heard much from the usual suspects.

But that’s not to say times are tough! Plenty of great music is streaming and downloadable right now, both from up-and-coming indie acts and locals. Here are my picks for the week.

Thundercat made himself known to indie audiences when he guested on Flying Lotus’ excellent “Cosmogramma” last year. FlyLo reciprocated by producing his debut LP, “The Golden Age of Apocalypse.” Stream it over at Hype Machine.  

Tulsa and Enid have combined to give us Good Morning Grizzly, a pretty, pop-rock project that put this first big track up for download. It’s called “Stars and Satellites,” and you can snag it at the band's Bandcamp page.

Hazy, Swedish, mix ’n’ mash duo jj have a new track up for download at Gorilla Vs. Bear. The lengthily named “You Don’t Know How Much It Would Hurt Me If You Said You Were in Love with Me,” it’s certainly creepier and sexier than anything they’ve previously recorded.

GVB is also streaming this new track from Twin Sister, who recorded one of the best songs we heard last year in “All Around and Away We Go.” Give ’em both a listen.

Okie Chase Kerby (The City Lives) is getting back into the pop-rock game with Defining Times. Their debut EP was up for free download earlier in the week, but now it’ll set you back $5. I call that money well-spent.

Peter Bjorn and John stopped by KEXP’s studios in Seattle to play a couple of tracks off their latest record, “Gimme Some.” Watch “Breaker, Breaker” (complete with cowbell!) below.



Ho, boy. This is the moment we’ve been waiting for. Much like the sneak peek at the single they set loose a little early a few weeks ago, New York dance-punk gods The Rapture streamed an in-studio listening party for their new album, “In the Grace of Your Love.” You might recall me blowing my top over “How Deep Is Your Love” a few weeks ago. This stream has amplified my anticipation for the album a dozenfold.



Oklahoma City rapper and good guy Jabee put out a remix to the track “Beautiful Day” off his “Lucky Me” mixtape. Give ’er the ol’ download and listen.

Also, Stephen Malkmus recently played a set of his new material at Amoeba Music in Hollywood. There, he also announced the winner of his blowjob contest. I promise it’s not as gross as you think.  



About a week ago, we heard a titillating tweet from James Blake promising a mysterious Bon Iver collab. It is now here and it is glorious.

by Matt Carney 08.26.2011 2 years ago
at 08:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: It always feels like somebody’s watchin’ me

A creepy local song gets a creepy local video.

In the Oklahoma music scene, few are eerier than Norman's Magnificent Bird, and just last week, the band posted an odd, alluring video to YouTube, to go with the song “Nowhere to Hide.” All rainy and black-and-white, a pretty, pale ghost haunts a depressed English major around the University of Oklahoma's campus. Watch it below.

You can stream their album “Superdark Can Happen to Anyone” at their Bandcamp page for free, or purchase it for $9.99. Also, the track “Cowboys are Blue Because of What They Have to Do” is available for free download.

by Matt Carney 10.17.2011 2 years ago
at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Two Suns rise

Not about Tatooine.

Norman-based indie recording project Two Suns just announced a novel release model for a very promising album.  “Dream Familiar” will be released at the rate of one song a week at the group’s Bandcamp page.


Opener “Ran Wild” is a pretty compelling six minutes of Radiohead-style ambient guitars (think  slowed-down take on “Weird Fishes/Arpeggi”’s swirling sound) with tribal and drum ’n’ bass rhythmic patterns. Toss in a breakdown with some cooing, shoegazey lyrics and we’ve got ourselves a neat little art project. Listen:



Read about Two Suns’ previous, eponymous EP,  and give ’em the ol' Facebook like.
by Matt Carney 01.11.2012 2 years ago
at 10:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

MPFree

Free music for you from The Rapture, Laura Gibson and a bunch of artists in ol’ Norman-town.

Economy — “Winter Recording Fiasco”
I have no idea what Economy is, nor anything more about the “Winter Recording Fiasco” than what the musical collective posted to its Bandcamp page, but judging by that information, it’s the Zanzibar! Records folks exploring their weirdness.

These songs are droning and creepy, pulsing with what sounds like bass keyboard and rhythmic lyrics like “keep the species alive.” They’re also topical enough to title a song after a certain dictator of North Korea, recently deceased.



The Rapture — “Sail Away” remixes
While The Rapture’s full-length fell a little more flat than I’d hoped, it had a couple of standout singles, and “Sail Away” was one of them. Cut Copy gives a signature tribal contribution, Aeroplane’s starts out sparse before blowing up into a full-on house rave, and Cosmic Kids win the award for choppiest chop-up. Their spacier, hypnotic take, complete with long-echoing, mixed-up vocals is about as different from the original as you can get. Thanks, DFA Records!



Laura Gibson — “La Grande”
Plaintive, pretty singer/songwriter Laura Gibson visits Opolis in February with Breathe Owl Breathe. Take this opportunity from NPR to get to know her.

Josh Sallee — “Ride Out”



What immediately grabbed me about this song was the cheesy, Grandma-giving-the-thumbs-up art, which initially triggered what I call a “whack-novelty” reaction deep within my brain. Then the track kicked in and I got all excited for his forthcoming album, “Probably Flaws.” Dude’s got skill, and it’s fun listening to him dance around the melody on the “Birthday Sex” sample. As solid a local hip-hop track as I've heard in a while.

by Matt Carney 01.16.2012 2 years ago
at 08:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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