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OKG Newsletter


Topic: Blu-Ray

Sharktopus

Your intelligence will be neither insulted nor triggered.


Sci-Fi

Rod Lott
Rave all you want about Julia Roberts: superstar, Oscar winner, self-appointed god. It's her brother, Eric, who has the more interesting career.
 
Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1

It’s the penultimate ‘Potter’


Family

Rob Collins
The “Harry Potter” franchise is humming along after a decade of filming.
 
Tuesday, April 19, 2011

The Terror / Dementia 13

Horror films get the good scrub-over they’ve always deserved


Horror

Rod Lott
Two Roger Corman classics from 1963, his own “The Terror” and Francis Ford Coppola’s “Dementia 13,” make their Blu-ray debut in — wait, hold up: What business does a pair of public-domain staples have in the high-def format of Blu-ray?
 
Monday, April 25, 2011

The Last Gun / 4 Dollars of Revenge

Old-fashioned and American-seeming Westerns


Western

Rod Lott
Spaghetti Western fans are bound to be disappointed by this double feature, no matter how appealing the packaging for the Mill Creek Entertainment Blu-ray is, which is a lot.
 
Tuesday, May 10, 2011

Murdoch Mysteries: Season 3

It’s like ‘CSI’ with manners


Television series

Rod Lott
Appearing on the cover of the Blu-ray season of "Murdoch Mysteries"' third season is the tagline, "Forensic Sleuthing in the Age of Invention."
 
Monday, June 27, 2011

Tekken

A video game comes to partial life in 'Tekken,' we reckon


Action

Rod Lott
Here's what I knew about the video game "Tekken" before watching the film it now has spawned: "Tekken" is a video game; I think it involves fighting.
 
Tuesday, July 5, 2011

Arthur

When you get caught between the moon and New York City, you're screwed.


Comedy

Rod Lott
If there's one good thing in the failed remake of "Arthur," it's that Hollywood can stop trying to make a leading man out of Russell Brand and move on to someone else.
 
Tuesday, July 12, 2011

13 Assassins

Samurai! Samurai! Samurai!


Action

Rod Lott
Proof that "13 Assassins" isn't your everyday Takashi Miike film: The opening scene depicts a man committing hara-kiri, and just as the sword is about to be inserted into his stomach, the director cuts away.
 
Friday, July 15, 2011
tekken

R&R Q&A with Dwight Little

The 'Tekken' director talks!

Based on the video game franchise, the live-action “Tekken” debuts Tuesday on Blu-ray and DVD. It’s directed by Dwight Little, whose work includes such films as “Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers,” “Marked for Death” with Steven Seagal, “Rapid Fire” with Brandon Lee, “Murder at 1600” with Wesley Snipes and “The Phantom of the Opera” with Robert Englund.

R&R: It’s been a while since you’ve done a feature film. You’ve been working a lot in TV, so why “Tekken”? What brought you back?

Little: It was a chance to re-collaborate with Alan McElroy, the screenwriter, who I did "Halloween 4" and "Rapid Fire" with, and he and I have a great, common creative interest and rapport. I thought the “Tekken” world was a great platform for a martial arts movie. I had some success with "Marked for Death" and "Rapid Fire," and it looked like it was in my area of expertise.

R&R: Were you familiar with the games?

Little: Only in sort of a passing way. I wasn't like a hardcore player, but my two boys are into it, so I get into vicariously. There was a mythology about the family and the Tekken corporation I got inspired by, like you get inspired by a short story or a novel. I also love the ever-changing, interactive fight designs — those were so visually interesting to me. I thought it'd be a way to freshen up the genre of a martial arts action movie.

R&R: Did you approach it any different because it was a video game first?

Little: You look at the existing source material and find the thing that makes you passionate or gets you excited. I made the movie like I would make “Rocky” or “Gladiator” — the goal is to make a good movie, not a good video game. You have to commit to the characters to keep viewers actively committed to the story. Poppy visuals are not going to do it for 100 minutes. Alan and I said, "You know what? Jin and his devil wings, and the boxing kangaroo — let's leave that for a CGI or an anime movie. Let's leave these heavy supernatural items on the table."

R&R: Obviously, you were invested in it, so are you disappointed its theatrical release was so small?

Little: Sure, but that reflects the world we live in. This movie, made 10 years ago, obviously would have been released on 2,000 screens. To market and release a movie now nationally is a $35-to-$40-million commitment in marketing. “Iron Man” and those movies can support that, but there's only seven distributors now, effectively. The way that smaller movies come to the marketplace in an era of a digital world — it's exactly the same as the music business. Our world is changing so fast, but “Tekken” will be platformed on Blu-ray, on Redbox, on iTunes, on VOD and Netflix and pay-per-view, and that's how movies go into the world unless it's Warner Bros. and they have that massive marketing muscle. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 07.15.2011 2 years ago
at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

The King of Fighters

Like 'Tekken,' but ... well, like 'Tekken.'


Action

Rod Lott
Hitting video one week after "Tekken" is "The King of Fighters," and the two share an awful lot in common: The live-action films are based on video-game franchises, more or less skipped theaters, place style over substance, and flirt with unresolved daddy issues as a subplot.
 
Monday, July 18, 2011
 
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