Tuesday 29 Jul
 
 
 photo BO-Button1_zps13524083.jpg

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: Drake

The Weeknd — Thursday

Damaged and menacing, The Weeknd continue to push R&B to its scariest limits.


Hip Hop/Rap

Matt Carney
I was finishing up college when the then-more-mysterious R&B project The Weeknd dropped their first mixtape, “House of Balloons,” for free online. Unfortunately for 21-year-old Canadian Abel Tesfaye (who’s credited as singer and songwriter) not enough has changed in that time to warrant increased praise for “Thursday,” although that’s not to say he’s produced (with the help of veteran Doc McKinney and the also-mysterious Illangelo) a bad album.
 
Tuesday, August 30, 2011
kevindurantheadphones

What’s good, KD? Part 2

What does Durantula think about the new Drake record?

You might recall my first entry in this series, wherein I tried to guide Oklahoma City Thunder some European basketball club’s starting small forward Kevin Durant toward meaner hip-hop from Pusha T, but judging by his recent Facebook post, “mean” and its many derivatives (“MEEEEAANN,” “MEEANN,” “MEEEEEEEAAAANN,” et. al.) is just a general term for a rap track he likes.

Early Tuesday morning, the reigning NBA scoring champ recommended the new Drake album, “Take Care,” via Twitter, and invited people to discuss it by way of Facebook. It’s a clear endorsement from a guy who’s long been singing the Canadian rapper/R&B crooner’s praises. Recall this ditty from December 2010, less than a month after the release of Kanye West’s “My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy”:


It’s easy to see why KD digs Drake. They’re both über-famous youngsters (Drake’s 25, Durant’s 23), coming of age amid worldwide stardom. Drake captures that feeling and shoots it up with some serious swagger on “Under Ground Kings” when he says, “It’s been two years since somebody asked me who I was.”

It’s been even longer than that for the prodigious Durant, who, at 6’9’’ and a freshman starter at Texas, commanded the spotlight in high school and during a brief college layover on his way to being drafted second overall in 2007. Drake’s rise shows a sharper upward trajectory (known first or his work on the teenage show “Degrassi,” he boasts nearly four times Durant’s Twitter followers), most likely because he’s rocketed to international pop star-status.

One Twitter follower asked KD what his favorite tracks from “Take Care” were. He responded with the opening track, “Over My Dead Body” (airy and slow, it’s a sonically curious selection, but a sensible one when you consider the opening lyric), and the more hype “Under Ground Kings,” which is built on wafting notes that vaguely recall the Chicago Bulls’ iconic intro music. The typically smug Drake sandpaper verse “I think I killed everybody in the game last year” is the aforementioned lyric, and if there’s a better description of two-time NBA scoring champ’s offensive prowess, I’d love to hear it.

If there were such a thing as an NBA season right now, every KD highlight video on YouTube would be soundtracked by “Under Ground Kings,” but the way things are going now we’ll probably just have to wait until he formally signs with whatever overseas ball club offers the best deal. Anybody know how much it costs to get the Israeli Basketball Super League package on cable?
by Matt Carney 11.17.2011 2 years ago
at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
 

‘Got Money’? You know it.

Photos from Lil' Wayne's visit to the WinStar World Casino.

It’s half a mile from one end of the WinStarWorld Casino to the other, and that 800 meters consists mostly of slot machines. It really is a sight to behold – the overwhelming rings and buzzing of winners and losers, and enough neon flashes to rival Kanye West’s “All of the Lights” music video. It’s all so distracting that, while leaving, I overheard one older patron ask “Why are there so many damn kids in here all of a sudden?” apparently unaware that one of the planet’s most prolific rappers had just performed less than 500 feet from her for about an hour and a half.

I’m a miserable sucker for big-budget pop hip-hop, and the opportunity to shoot a major player like Drake’s boss proved too irresistible to ignore the two-hour drive to Thackerville. Unfortunately I found out when I got there that house rules prevented entry to the security pit near the stage, so I had to compete with a mongrel horde of iPhone-wielding nutjobs, but I think I got a few decent shots of the rapper.

First things first, Weezy, who makes me think he’s a gremlin who won an all-expenses-paid trip to Hot Topic whenever I see him, was sporting a cartoonish hoodie advocating Odd Future’s most mysterious member, Earl Sweatshirt when he came out onstage. He pulled “Tha Carter III” staples “Got Money” and “A Milli” out pretty early, as well as “Swag Surfin” off the excellent “No Ceilings” mixtape, all of which drove people into a frenzy. Unfortunately the mostly-Dallas crowd’s collective energy waned over the course of the show, as Wayne snuck away from his best material and into his newer, less interesting catalogue.

It’s been a good year for guest spots from the New Orleans emcee (arguably even better than most of the verses on his own “Tha Carter IV” album), and his contributions to Chris Brown’s “Look at Me Now” (gah, how awesome would it have been if he'd have pulled out that Busta Rhymes verse, too?) and Drake’s “HYFR” were sandwiched into the middle of the set with his own “John,” which is basically a Rick Ross cover anyway. A predictably lewd, comical R&B suite followed, punctuated by a cheeseball version of “Lollipop” complete with acoustic guitar and maracas, and his most recently regrettable song, “How to Love.”

And for the big, clumsy rock-and-roll near-closer Wayne strapped on an unplugged guitar and strummed it a few times for “Prom Queen,” which was really unfortunate considering much of “Tha Carter III” and the mixtapes immediately before it constitute serious low-culture art. But the people all around raged their faces off to the trumped-up tunes anyway

“6 Foot, 7 Foot” was the true final song of the night, and the dude just unleashed a deranged ferociousness that even extended to Cory Gunz’s hair-singeing speed verse that made me wish he’d attacked every song like that. Oh, well. I suppose there’s a price to becoming one of the world’s biggest pop stars, and only Kanye knows how to pay it without souring his musical output.

Full gallery below.

by Matt Carney 12.30.2011 2 years ago
at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Drake — Take Care

Canadian crooner raps less, slow-jams more on his visionary, 80-minute sophomore LP.


Hip Hop/Rap

Matt Carney
If the minimal, Toronto R&B sound of Drake and collaborators Abel Tesfaye (AKA, The Weeknd), Boi-1da and Doc McKinney winds up as influential on hip-hop as many critics seem to think, then “Take Care”’s legacy will be long-lasting and often-marked.
 
Monday, December 5, 2011

Doobie-ous drake


CFN

Gazette staff
“Take Care” and “Make Me Proud” are two tracks off Drake’s latest album, Take Care.
 
Wednesday, April 4, 2012

A$AP Rocky — Long.Live.A$AP.


Hip Hop/Rap

Ryan Querbach
Harlem, New York, rapper A$AP Rocky has released his highly anticipated debut album, Long.Live.A$AP.
 
Friday, January 25, 2013

Laugh it


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff

Do you like to laugh out loud? Then check out Opolis Comedy Night, featuring comedic whiz kid James Nghiem as he releases his new album That Lonely Beast. Other performers include Cameron Buchholtz, Ryan Drake, Jeramy Westbrook and more. Laughs commence 9 p.m. Thursday at Opolis, 113 N. Crawford in Norman. Admission is $5. Visit opolis.org.

Thursday

 
Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Odd men out

The eponymous Odd Couple may be dated, but it’s only slightly more than a story about a neatnik and a slob.


Performing Arts

Larry Laneer

The Odd Couple

Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma

7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 8 p.m. Fridays, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturdays through Feb. 15

Plaza Theatre

1725 NW 16th St.

lyrictheatreokc.com

524-9312

$40

 
Wednesday, February 5, 2014

Darkman

Who is Darkman? It's time you knew.


Action

Rod Lott
Prior to his Spider-Man trilogy, director Sam Raimi cut his superhero-movie teeth on 1990's Darkman, a character of his own creation. Although it's clearly not the most polished of his works, the summer sleeper plays even better as the years tick by. Look no further than Shout! Factory's colorful re-release on Blu-ray. 
 
Tuesday, February 25, 2014
 
Close
Close
Close