Thursday 24 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: HBO

Maher causes cancer


Letters to the Editor

Steve Finefrock
“Wrong and rotten” — the catchiest description of Bill Maher, reaching back to his days of daze on ABC’s “Politically Incorrect” as coined by Salem Radio host Hugh Hewitt.
 
Monday, March 7, 2011
openingnights

Working for the weekend

Have you planned your long Fourth of July weekend yet?

Friends! We have less than two days of work before the long holiday weekend. I’m tempted to ask for an “Amen!” here, but I’ll refrain.

So, who’s got plans? And can I crash them? I’m considering spending the long weekend holed up indoors watching a marathon of “Parks and Recreation” — it’d be a nice palate cleanser after finishing (the very good) “Game of Thrones.” (Reason No. 1 for needing a palate cleanser? Wading through HBO’s annoying formula of tossing boobs into every show whether the plot and/or scene warrants it or not.)

The “Parks and Rec” marathon idea sounds especially fun after watching this hilarious gag reel (please be advised that it’s NSFW unless you turn the volume way down or work here with me at the Gazette):



But you’re not all would-be recluses with a penchant for salty language. And some of these Fourth of July events are tempting even me to crawl out from my TV-lit hidey-hole.

First up, a guided evening hike to search for fireflies. Martin Park Nature Center is leading the hike — called Ma Nature’s Fireworks — this Sunday. The hike sets off at 8 p.m., and registration is limited (and $2). Led by former park naturalist and all-around smart guy Neil Garrison, the tour will teach about the biology of fireflies while the hikers keep an eye out for the glowing beasties.

That sounds perfect, right? I may just have to borrow someone’s kid so I can attend without looking like a creeper. Call 755-0676 for more info or to register.

The following day (that’d be July 4, for those playing at home), the Crystal Bridge at the newly renovated Myriad Botanical Gardens will offer free admission. This is a great opportunity to explore both the gardens and the tropical conservatory, which both got a major face-lift.
by Jenny Coon Peterson 06.30.2011 3 years ago
at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Eastbound & Down: The Complete Second Season

HBO's sauciest series scores another homer


Television series

Rod Lott
When we last saw egotistical, repulsive, overweight, rude, crude, arrogant, self-centered, self-destructive, alcoholic, weed-smoking, coke-snorting former pro baseball player Kenny Powers, he had left the love of his life on the side of the road and high-tailed it to Mexico, the no-good bum.
 
Monday, August 1, 2011

The Pee-wee Herman Show on Broadway

The secret word is 'fun.'


Comedy

Rod Lott
I must admit to being just a little disappointed in Paul Reubens' triumphant return as Pee-wee Herman — and on the Great White Way, no less — because I felt as if I had seen it before. In a way, I have, because this hit stage show resurrects many of the same skits and bits from where many of us got our first taste of Pee-wee: his 1981 stage show, which aired on HBO.
 
Monday, October 3, 2011

How to Make It in America: The Complete First Season

Like 'Entourage,' minus all the douchiness.


Television series

Rod Lott
"How to Make It in America" is HBO's Rodney Dangerfield: It gets no respect. As critics creamed over the tediously paced "Boardwalk Empire," this eight-episode wonder seemed to escape mass-media's gaze. I can understand why: Who wants to see a show about two guys trying to launch a line of jeans?
 
Monday, October 3, 2011

R&R Q&A with Michael Shannon

The ‘Boardwalk Empire’ actor talks shop and Superman, which gives him ‘the shivers.’

Michael Shannon made his motion-picture debut alongside Bill Murray in “Groundhog Day,” but his career really didn’t take off until 2008, when his supporting performance as the mentally unstable acquaintance of Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet in “Revolutionary Road” was honored with an Academy Award nomination.

The roles have grown in size ever since, from “Jonah Hex” to two films with the legendarily idiosyncratic director Werner Herzog in “Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans” and “My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done.” The most notable, however, has been his good-guy role as Agent Nelson Van Alden on HBO’s Emmy-winning “Boardwalk Empire.”

Earlier this week, Shannon talked to Gazette about “Boardwalk,” now airing its second season, and the project that threatens to take his star into the stratosphere: the Superman reboot in which he plays the Man of Steel’s Kryptonian nemesis, General Zod.

R&R: “Boardwalk Empire” is really the first time you've worked on a TV series other than a guest shot. Does it feel completely different than being on a movie set or is the level of quality so high that there's no difference?

Shannon: The structure of it's very different. I mean, when you do a movie, you get one script —  unless there are going to be sequels or something — but you get the one script and it has a beginning, middle and an end, and you go shoot it and that's that.

But this is ... it's not like you're telling a story. It's like you're creating a whole other world, you know, that moves in every direction. And the story just keeps getting more and more twisted and complicated. I walk away from the end of the season and I have absolutely no idea what to expect. It's very mysterious.

R&R: This is sort of your time right now. I mean, “Boardwalk” is airing, “Take Shelter” is out, “13” is finally coming out on DVD. It's like Michael Shannon week! Did you ever think you would be at this point? I mean, you've worked a long time, but it's only since “Revolutionary Road” that the industry as a whole took notice.


Shannon:
I've always been happy just to be working, you know. It doesn't really matter for me how many people are familiar with my name or my picture or whatever. I enjoyed living in Chicago and doing plays for little or no money. And I never actually thought that I would leave Chicago originally. I wasn't one of these people that had a plan to pack up the van and drive out to Hollywood. I didn't want to. I knew other people that did that and a lot of them wound up kind of unhappy, so it kind of frightened me.

So the fact that I got to ... I guess to get to this point kind of surreptitiously is really incredibly fortunate for me, because I kind of got this without even necessarily chasing after it. I just kept doing work that I believed in and it kind of led me to this place, but I'm always very reticent to buy into any of the hype, because it goes away in the blink of any eye, you know. And you make one wrong move, you can find yourself back in obscurity.

But it's not something I'm really keeping a lot of attention to. I'm not looking at my star meter or something, you know, how many people are talking about me or something. I just keep working on things I like and hope for the best, hope people enjoy them.

R&R: Then are you prepared for the onslaught with “Man of Steel”? The press on that is going to be outrageous.

Shannon: Honestly, no. I'm not prepared for that in any way, shape or form. It gives me shivers. I'll do the best I can, but ... it's funny because it used to just be that you do the work and the work just spoke for itself.


R&R:
Right.

Shannon: But when you get on a project like that, obviously, it's almost like half the job is being a cheerleader for the team. You got to go around, stirring up the pot, as it were. But it's hard to do that when they tell you, "Oh, and by the way, you can't say anything about it. And the only thing you should say is, “It's really great. It's really great. I'm having such a great time and everybody's great.” That gets a little frustrating after a while.

I find it kind of funny actually, because if I didn't tell you anything about Superman, but I asked you, “Tell me what happens in Superman,” I bet you could probably tell me the whole story. I mean, it's kind of like saying, “I'm not supposed to talk about the Pledge of Allegiance.” It's kind of silly.

R&R: Has Agent Nelson Van Alden become a favorite character of yours because you've worked with him so long or do you have another that stands out for you more?

Shannon: Well, I get pretty attached to the majority of the characters I play. I mean, I can't help myself, but the thing with Van Alden is, I always look forward to seeing what's going to be next, and that's a very different experience than anything else I've done.

But I do have a lot of sympathy for him. I think Van Alden has a very hard life and I feel for him. And a lot of people will stop me and say, “Oh, I watch ‘Boardwalk Empire.’ I love the show, you're good on it, but I hate your character. He's such as asshole." It’s a little upsetting, so I say, "Why do you think he's a bad guy?" I mean, is it so hard to understand what happened to him or is he too opaque or something?

Because when I look at him, he makes me really sad. He tried really hard to do the right thing and he failed, and then he kind of went off the tracks. But, yes, the character seems to illicit some really negative feelings from people, which makes me a little defensive sometimes.

R&R: What’s next for you?

Shannon: Let's see, I've got the two films out right now, “Take Shelter” and “Machine Gun Preacher,” and “Take Shelter,” I'm really excited about people seeing that, because I think it's pretty good. “Machine Gun Preacher” is all right, too.

Let's see, I did a movie called “Premium Rush” with Joseph Gordon-Levitt, which I think is coming out next summer. But right now, I'm just shooting “Man of Steel” all the way up until February, and then (season three of) “Boardwalk Empire” starts in February, so there's not a lot of downtime there. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 10.28.2011 2 years ago
at 12:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

The Cannonball Run

It’s the Burt that hurts.


Comedy

Rod Lott
In my tween days, 1981’s “The Cannonball Run” played HBO so often, one would think the cable channel had been taken over by Dom DeLuise. My brothers and I watched it with seemingly every airing.
 
Friday, October 28, 2011

Mildred Pierce

Joan Crawford, you've been pwned.


Television series

Rod Lott
How does a director go from shooting a Barbie-dolls biography of doomed vocalist Karen Carpenter to a prestige miniseries starring perhaps the greatest screen actress of her generation?
 
Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Point broke


CFN

Gazette staff
Had actor Gary Busey not allegedly attacked a woman at a Tulsa airport last summer, the one-time Oklahoman might be able to breathe a little easier. Actually, scratch that — he’s in way over his head, according to documents related to his Feb. 7 filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.
 
Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Mick ’n’ Maher


CFN

Gazette staff
Oklahoma City Mayor Mick Cornett’s TV appearances have included happy-go-lucky talk-show hosts Rachael Ray and Ellen DeGeneres, but hizzoner took a walk on the wild side March 16 when he turned up on HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher.
 
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
 
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