Monday 21 Apr
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: Kanye West

Rocky Business — A Rebel's Roar

A good taste of what the rap/pop duo can do


Hip Hop/Rap

Stephen Carradini
It’s a hard balance to strike between “masses-pleasing nonsense” and “critically pleasing art.”
 
Thursday, April 7, 2011

Theophilus London — Timez Are Weird These Days

He’s a long way from the next Kanye.


Hip Hop/Rap

Matt Carney
Judging by the ads Warner Bros. Records is running on Pitchfork, the lack of coverage in more conventional rap and hip-hop media outlets, and hired-gun producer Dan Carey’s résumé (Hot Chip, M.I.A., La Roux), the juggernaut label is marketing Theophilus London’s debut LP, “Timez Are Weird These Days,” toward hipsters instead of a more conventional hip-hop audience.
 
Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Ben Kilgore on 'The VDub Sessions'

Soulful Tulsa singer gets in the van.

This might just be my favorite-ever installment of “The VDub Sessions.”

For one thing, you’ve got Tulsa’s strongest male singer, and for another, you’ve got him covering one of the GOATs (greatest of all-time). What more do you need? Here’s Ben Kilgore singing Otis Redding’s immortal “These Arms of Mine”:



Y’know, this kinda begs the question: Do you prefer Mr. Kilgore’s earnest-to-goodness Redding cover to Kanye West and Jay-Z’s recent tribute-sample track, “Otis”? I certainly do. But you decide for yourself.
by Matt Carney 08.11.2011 2 years ago
at 02:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Kanye and Jay-Z have more fun than you

Spike Jonze puts a Spike Jonze twist on old hip-hop schtick for ‘Otis.’

I can’t think of a more tired concept for a hip-hop music video than a couple of pop stars riding around in an expensive car with a handful of models. But somehow, director Spike Jonze does exactly that and winds up with a classic. He’s come a long way since getting high in high school.

For starters, ’Ye and Jigga strip down a Maybach to look more like a luxury Jeep Wrangler, and then they start playing with fire. Literally. Watch for yourself. And keep an eye out for a brief Tom Haverford cameo. I wonder if they shot it in the City of Pawnee?



Anyhoo, expect a review of “Watch the Throne” early next week. And for more Otis Redding-related videos, check out yesterday’s video of Ben Kilgore covering “These Arms of Mine” for “The VDub Sessions.”

by Matt Carney 08.12.2011 2 years ago
at 10:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Kanye West and Jay-Z — Watch the Throne

Modern-day hip-hop legends pair up to go ‘hard as a motherf***er.’


Hip Hop/Rap

Matt Carney
Hey, have you guys heard of this new rap band called Kanye West and Jay-Z? Yeah, apparently they released an album exclusively on iTunes last week that pissed off a lot of record-store owners. Not sure if you’ve heard of it, so I’ll try to break down “Watch the Throne” for you, since these guys are kinda obscure.
 
Monday, August 15, 2011

Kid Cudi feels ‘Fright’

And the clip has fangs.

With the blogosphere erupting over the Kanye West/Jay-Z joint (do we call them “albums” anymore?), Kid Cudi couldn’t have picked a worse time to release his video for “No One Believes Me.”

Actually, it’s not his fault: It’s the “official” music vid for DreamWorks’ remake of “Fright Night,” which opens Friday. I’m under one of those dreaded review embargoes, so I can’t tell you until Friday whether I think the Colin Farrell/Anton Yelchin starrer falls short of the 1985 horror-comedy classic; or whether I think its 3-D effects are needless; or whether I think Imogen Poots (despite her flatulent name) is way, way, way hotter than Amanda Bearse.

In the meantime, Kid Cudi! As with the film, the lushly orchestrated clip is directed by Craig Gillespie (“Lars and the Real Girl”) and looks to take place on the same set. Its dark tone is right in line with the picture, and it’s nice to see what it essentially “just” a tie-in have merit on its own. —Rod Lott

by Rod Lott 08.16.2011 2 years ago
at 08:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

MPFree: Upcoming indie bands and locals aplenty!

Doing the legwork so you don't have to.

It’s been a slow couple of months for interesting new music from established acts, be they indie or mainstream. Other than Kanye and Jay-Z’s epic collaboration on “Watch the Throne,” we haven’t heard much from the usual suspects.

But that’s not to say times are tough! Plenty of great music is streaming and downloadable right now, both from up-and-coming indie acts and locals. Here are my picks for the week.

Thundercat made himself known to indie audiences when he guested on Flying Lotus’ excellent “Cosmogramma” last year. FlyLo reciprocated by producing his debut LP, “The Golden Age of Apocalypse.” Stream it over at Hype Machine.  

Tulsa and Enid have combined to give us Good Morning Grizzly, a pretty, pop-rock project that put this first big track up for download. It’s called “Stars and Satellites,” and you can snag it at the band's Bandcamp page.

Hazy, Swedish, mix ’n’ mash duo jj have a new track up for download at Gorilla Vs. Bear. The lengthily named “You Don’t Know How Much It Would Hurt Me If You Said You Were in Love with Me,” it’s certainly creepier and sexier than anything they’ve previously recorded.

GVB is also streaming this new track from Twin Sister, who recorded one of the best songs we heard last year in “All Around and Away We Go.” Give ’em both a listen.

Okie Chase Kerby (The City Lives) is getting back into the pop-rock game with Defining Times. Their debut EP was up for free download earlier in the week, but now it’ll set you back $5. I call that money well-spent.

Peter Bjorn and John stopped by KEXP’s studios in Seattle to play a couple of tracks off their latest record, “Gimme Some.” Watch “Breaker, Breaker” (complete with cowbell!) below.



Ho, boy. This is the moment we’ve been waiting for. Much like the sneak peek at the single they set loose a little early a few weeks ago, New York dance-punk gods The Rapture streamed an in-studio listening party for their new album, “In the Grace of Your Love.” You might recall me blowing my top over “How Deep Is Your Love” a few weeks ago. This stream has amplified my anticipation for the album a dozenfold.



Oklahoma City rapper and good guy Jabee put out a remix to the track “Beautiful Day” off his “Lucky Me” mixtape. Give ’er the ol’ download and listen.

Also, Stephen Malkmus recently played a set of his new material at Amoeba Music in Hollywood. There, he also announced the winner of his blowjob contest. I promise it’s not as gross as you think.  



About a week ago, we heard a titillating tweet from James Blake promising a mysterious Bon Iver collab. It is now here and it is glorious.

by Matt Carney 08.26.2011 2 years ago
at 08:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

VOTD: Kanye-Z do ‘Otis’ at the VMAs

In case you were curious what two of the world’s biggest pop stars performing live for the masses looked like.

Well, this is exciting. Kanye and Jay-Z played their new hit together at the VMAs, and, despite apparently not rehearsing, they totally rocked an arena full of cheering fans (save for a certain Biebster who did not appear impressed). I think I speak for the planet when I say that it needs a “Watch the Throne” tour.

by Matt Carney 08.29.2011 2 years ago
at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Beet it

Beetyman’s recipe for his rhymes: being the underdog. The result: rising to the top of his class.


Music

Joshua Boydston

Beetyman with Dom Kennedy, Josh Sallee and more
9 p.m. Friday
Kamp’s Deli & Market
1310 N.W. 25th
819-6004
$17 advance, $20 door

 
Wednesday, September 7, 2011

OKS Chatter: Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.

The Detroit band talks Wayne Coyne, hip-hop beats, pop radio and Pitchfork.

The three best shows I saw at this year’s Austin City Limits Music Festival were two obvious choices (Kanye West, Arcade Fire) and one dark horse I’d pinned a lot of hope on. That band is Detroit’s Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr., and the duo’s Sunday-afternoon set showed off their flair for garish styles, fun-loving melodies, twinkling electronic textures, falsetto harmonizing, bubble machines and straight-up rock ’n’ roll. Also, they tossed Popsicles to a thankful crowd, heat-exhausted by three days of loud music in the Texas sun.

With those antics – the names, the games, the showmanship, these press photos  – it’s hard to tell whether or not Daniel Zott and Joshua Epstein have their tongues wriggling in their cheeks. Luckily, I had the chance to chat with them the day before their set, and the guys seem as genuine as the homegrown, preservative-free cheese I bought at Forward Foods during my lunch break yesterday.



My verdict: They’re ambitious, quirky guys who record weirdly lovable music and are nostalgic for a time when physical media was more important and radio stations crackled with music that was beautiful and challenging. But I’m rambling now. On to the chatting:

Zott: So what’s up with Wayne Coyne? He gets to do whatever he wants on a major label, and everyone loves him. It’s weird.

Epstein: He has like, three houses, right? Right in a row?

OKS: It’s actually four. He’s expanded. I think they’re all back-to-back, and connected by the backyard. It’s just a gigantic compound.

Epstein: That’s so weird.

OKS: It’s in the shady side of Oklahoma City, so the houses are probably pretty cheap. He’s spent a lot of money remodeling and redecorating them.

“Nothing but Our Love” at ACL 2011


Epstein: That’s awesome. Is he part of the community?

OKS: I see him at concerts all the time. There’s a venue in Norman called Opolis, where a lot of the smaller-name indie acts come through, and he’s there with friends and family at a lot of the shows I go to. He just walks right up to the stage, pulls out his phone and tweets photos. He’s checking out new bands and hanging around.

But on to you guys. One of the things I like so much about your music is that a lot of it’s textured with electronica — the little fizzly sounds that keep things going. How is that coming out of Detroit? It seems very different to me, from most of the music that comes out of there.

Music video for “Simple Girl”


Zott: You’re talking about the garage-rock scene.

OKS: Yeah, that’s usually what I think about when I hear about Detroit.

Zott: There’s that element, and we do have a rock element to our sound, but Detroit does have an electronic scene that’s really huge. It kinda started there.

Epstein: Yeah, techno music came from Detroit.

Zott: There’s a lot of bands doing that kinda stuff right now, and the roots are there for it. A lot of bands we like are electronic-type bands. It’s more natural than you think, there’s a lot of electronic tinkering going on up there.

Epstein: There’s a huge, underground hip-hop scene that’s getting notoriety also. I think hip-hop’s actually a big part of our music, too.

Zott: I’d say more so than electronica is a hip-hop type vibe. It’s a little bit warmer. There’s a groovier beat than a stale, 4-4 beat.

OKS: I definitely feel like – listening to you guys’ music – it’s more intimate and warm-sounding.

Zott: Yeah, there’s definitely some of that electronic texturing, but it’s Detroit to us.

OKS: You guys did the “Summer Babe” cover for The A.V. Club. Do you guys have a particular affinity for Pavement, or that song in particular?

Epstein: Well, the songs had to have “Summer” in the title, but I’ve always been a huge Pavement fan, so it seemed to be a pretty obvious choice.

Zott: And I hadn’t listened to them much. Usually when we do a cover or a remix or something like that, one of us has heard the song and the other hasn’t, so it makes it more fun because you can’t quite put as much of a spin on the song if you know it in and out. That’s really hard to do. I think we were able to get away from it because I wasn’t familiar. Josh kept the things that we needed to keep, but we also made it fresh.

OKS: Let me ask you guys about your album, particularly the Gil Scott-Heron cover, “We Almost Lost Detroit.” Did you guys pick that one out because you’re big fans of Gil Scott-Heron, or because of the hometown mention, or kind of a mix of both, or what?

“We Almost Lost Detroit” live on KEXP


Epstein: I think initially it was because of Detroit. We really liked the version we did. It felt updated, in comparison to the original. But also we really liked the sentiment in it. It sums up so much about our record, especially the name “It’s a Coporate World,” so it felt like we had to include it. It was just kinda meant to be.

OKS: Do you guys’ songs start out with words, or do you go melody first or what?

Zott: It’s different every time. I think the key is to keep it inspired and to avoid forcing anything. Sometimes Josh’ll have an idea and we’ll work it out, sometimes I’ll have an idea and we’ll work it out, sometimes we push something together, or sometimes we write a whole song and there’s no lyrics. Sometimes you need to make lyrics sound good. It’s different every time, I think.

OKS: If you guys had to record a pop album or a folk album, which one would you choose?

Zott: That’s where we’re kind of a mix. We want to be a pop band. We hate the idea that a pop band has to be dumbed-down — lyrically, sonically, chord structure-wise. It used to not be like that. “God Only Knows” was a massive hit worldwide, and that song has the weirdest chords in it, it has time-signature changes, a key change. It’s weird: It would never fly right now on pop-radio format.

God Only Knows:


OKS: It’s morbid, too.

Zott: Yeah! It was considered a beautiful love song, and it is. But it’s got these funky lyrics that aren’t typical love-song lyrics. But we think people can still digest that stuff, and people do. I’d like to write a pop album that breaks that rule. We’re just making music we love, that we think could be pop music and doesn’t necessarily have to be Top-40 radio. It can be complex. I think we’d do a pop record.

Epstein: To me, they both exist within me, and I don’t think I can separate them. I’ll still feel the need to write lyrics that are meaningful and challenging. You can do it. People just aren’t doing it in the Top 40 anymore. The system’s a bit broken. People at the radio stations want to keep their jobs. Radio plays a huge role to make bands visible to people who aren’t on blogs, who don’t seek out new things.

People who read Pitchfork fail to realize that most people in the world don’t read Pitchfork. I was working with this band, recording a song, and they were like, “Pitchfork’s gonna love this.” And I told them they were idiots. Do it because you love, not because Pitchfork’s gonna like it. They’re just one opinion, anyways. Somehow they’ve managed to make people think they’re the authority.

I just think that, ultimately, if it were DJs playing the songs they wanted to play, like it was in the ‘60s, then we’d have a much more diverse popular music scene. People are hungry for good stuff. That’s how Phoenix became a Top-40 band. I think mostly probably because it was so different when it played on those stations. People were like, “Holy crap! What is this? It’s not Nickelback!” y’know?

OKS: So are you guys going to get to go around at the fest at all? Who are you going to see?

Zott: If we have time, we’d love to see Stevie Wonder.

Epstein: As a musician, it’s really hard for me to go to a show and just be entertained. And when bands can do that, I’m always so blown away. Like going to a Flaming Lips show: You feel like a little kid and you just want to cry. I learn a lot from them.

Zott: I don’t go to concerts, which is kind of a weird thing. I guess I’m going to have to make up for it now.

Epstein: I go to too many. I played with OK Go one time, and they said something along the lines of, “Everything we do, we try to be like The Flaming Lips.”
by Matt Carney 09.28.2011 2 years ago
at 01:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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