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OKG Newsletter


Topic: The Neighborhood
NMF4SplashPagehi

NMF announces lineup

Oh, man, I can’t believe they got ... no, wait a minute

In previous years, Norman Music Festival has done an incredible job of bringing acts to town that would rarely, if ever, come here. Of Montreal, Dirty Projectors and The Polyphonic Spree are were headliners that sparked an “oh, man, I can’t believe that they got them” excitement.

This year’s main stage doesn’t feature an artist like that. With the exception of Ty Segall, four of the five national touring acts on the main stage have been in the metro before (two of them in Norman!) within the last two years:

The Walkmen: Meacham Auditorium, October 2009
Black Joe Lewis and the Honeybears: Diamond Ballroom, June 2009
• Peelander-Z: The Conservatory, October 2010, among other concerts
• Foot Patrol: Opolis, May 2010

Here’s the full Saturday main stage schedule, in reverse:

9:30 p.m. — The Walkmen
8 p.m. — Black Joe Lewis & The Honeybears
6:30 p.m. — PeeLander-Z
5 p.m. — Ty Segall
3:30 p.m. — The Fortune Tellers
2:30 p.m. — Foot Patrol
1:40 p.m. — The Non
12:50 p.m. — Penny Hill Party

Headliner letdown aside, I’m relentlessly stoked that The Non finally made it to the main stage, but I’m baffled that they’re opening for The Fortune Tellers on the bill. The Fortune Tellers are an on-again/off-again band based in the metro and, uh, Greece.

I’m also surprised in a good way that Penny Hill is opening the main stage (and a band, I’m assuming, as the “party” bit). Good for her!

Headlining other stages: jam band dude Keller Williams on the Jagermeister Stage, Mississippi indie-rockers Color Revolt (not to be confused with Colourmusic) on Sooner Theater Stage, and Austin indie-pop group White Denim at Opolis.

But the most exciting headliner of the entire festival is on Thursday night at Opolis, as Norman indie-rockers The Neighborhood are re-forming. Philip Rice (now of Visions of Choruses), Matt Duckworth (now of Stardeath and the White Dwarfs), Blake Studdard (also Visions of Choruses) and Eric Mai threw down some of the best rock that the metro has heard in recent years, and it was a shame that it fizzled out a couple years back. And now they’re back for at least one show, and perhaps more. This is one of the biggest, if not the biggest, headline of the festival.   

NMF4 is scheduled for April 28-30. The Gazette will be there, tweeting and blogging away, just as at SXSW.

by Stephen Carradini 04.04.2011 3 years ago
at 01:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Urban renewal

Phone the neighbors, wake the kids: Defunct local popsters The Neighborhood reunite for the Norman Music Festival.


Music

Stephen Carradini

The Neighborhood
12:30 a.m. Friday, Norman Music Festival
Opolis, 113 N. Crawford
NormanMusicFestival.com
Free

 
Wednesday, April 27, 2011
StudentFilmVertical

NMF: Student Film/The Neighborhood

Two Oklahoma City greats tear it up

For me, Student Film is the Oklahoma indie-rock OG. When I was just getting into Oklahoma City music in 2006, Student Film had already kicking it for years. The band started before The Neighborhood did, kept playing after they broke up and was still performing by the time that Philip Rice and company reunited (which happens in several paragraphs). If Student Film's shows have a little bit of Charlie Daniels-esque "That's how you do it, son" air about them, well, they earned it. 

And they keep earning it, by churning out complex, frantic, erratic rock. Their NMF set at Opolis caused me to keep looking back and forth between members to determine who was making what noise. The blaring keys and thrashy bass held most of my interest, as they dominated the sound. These aren't simple songs in any universe; the songwriting and arrangement is head-spinning. That they can perform it live with such panache is the other half of the reason they're the OG. Student Film isn't for everyone, as the tunes can occasionally err on the side of heady noise, but the best moments toward the back of their set were thoroughly inclusive. "Witchitawesome" set, guys; just writing about it is causing my computer to freak out (seriously).

This is what it was like.

And then, lo and behold, The Neighborhood. In the aforementioned beginnings of my time in Oklahoma City music, The Neighborhood was the first band I truly loved. Their passionate songs struck a chord in me that hadn't been hit before by tunes of the pop/rock persuasion (I still cringe at calling them pop/rock because the tunes mean so much more than most "pop" ditties). Pretty much everything I've heard from them has been golden. When they broke up, it was a sad, sad day.

It was, then, with great anticipation that I awaited this set. People flew and drove in from out of state to be at this concert. I saw people I hadn't seen in years. This was, by my humble reckoning, an "I was there" type of moment. The Neighborhood did not disappoint.

After setting up the stage in their particular idiom (drums stage left, facing the band), they kicked off the set with "Your Longest Day," which whipped everyone into a dancing/moshing frenzy that only let up during their two acoustic tunes. The Neighborhood's energy fed through the audience and back to the band, resulting in one of the most awe-inspiring sets I've witnessed in years. It was easily the best performance I saw at Norman Music Festival.

This is what it felt like.

The band tore through favorites off "Our Voices Choked With Fireworks" ("Stand Up, Chin Up, and Say," "Slingshots and Cannons") as well as unreleased ragers like "What? Hey!" and a song that probably isn't called "In the Lawn" but should be. The four-piece showed negligible signs of rust, missing only a single note in a bass solo the during opener. The rest of the set was flawless, either in truth or in audience perception. For the group to be spot-on after three years of not playing together is absolutely incredible. 

Everyone sang, danced and sweated. No one had reason to be disappointed, unless they had held out hope for "The Television Set" — but that's no party song. And that's what The Neighborhood brought: a huge party. Good news for those who missed it: I've been told there will be more of these concerts going down. Hallelujah.

by Stephen Carradini 05.05.2011 3 years ago
at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 
 
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