Friday 25 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: appropriate

Stage this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Warning: Not appropriate for children or those with virgin ears! The Actors Warehouse Studio stages its last shows of “Hurlyburly,” a play highlighting the good, bad and the ugly about Hollywood in the 1980s.
 
Wednesday, September 28, 2011
monsterbrawl

R&R with Jesse Thomas Cook

Talking with the mastermind behind ‘Monster Brawl,’ the movies’ ultimate fight of the living dead.

No apologies necessary if you don’t recognize the name of Jesse Thomas Cook. Just know that the Canadian filmmaker is to the new film Monster Brawl what Vince McMahon is to the WWE: its supreme leader. The wrestling analogy is apropos, given that the writer/director’s movie is, as the title promises, all about creatures battling it out in the ring.

R&R:
From watching the movie, it's obvious you love wrestling and monsters, but what about comic books? Because I got a definite comic-book vibe from it.

Cook:
Yeah, I mean there is that feel to it. I wasn't a huge comic book fan, but a lot of the people involved in the movie were, especially Jason Brown, who designed all of the monsters and the sets.

R&R:
Being structured as a wrestling match, Monster Brawl is not traditional storytelling. And you’re catching flak for that from some reviewers. Did you expect that going in?

Cook:
It exists outside of a traditional movie structure, for sure. It's more of a pay-per-view event and tournament-style movie. That's why we put in the backstories, that let us cut away here and there to get a glimpse of each monster.

R&R:
Was DVD your ultimate goal from the start, or did you have visions of a huge theatrical release?

Cook:
We knew going in this would be probably more of a VOD and DVD and Blu-ray. It's really hard to do theatrical nowadays as an indie film. No, we didn't have huge ambitions for that. We had a limited theatrical release in Canada and thought it would play well at midnight screenings, and it has.

R&R: I was surprised at how kid-friendly it actually is. Other than the character being named Witch Bitch and some minor gore, I could let my 7-year-old watch this. And believe me, he really wanted to, but since I hadn’t yet seen it, I couldn’t find any info online at how appropriate it was.

Cook:
We wanted to make it accessible to everyone, even people who weren't huge fans of wrestling and monsters. We just wanted to make a fun movie.

R&R:
And you may be too close to it to answer this, but are you pleased with it?

Cook:
Absolutely, looking back a year or two after, we could've done things here and there, but with the money with had and such a small crew, I think we pulled off something really special. The budget wasn't much more than a documentary film would have. If there were ever a sequel, it'd be nice to have a bigger budget, but that's something down the road.

R&R:
How possible is that?

Cook:
I think it's very possible. There's been talks of a remake. We've had discussions about that with a few companies. If that weren't to happen, we'd definitely explore trying to do a sequel or turning it into some kind of franchise.

R&R:
If you do have a sequel, what monsters might be in it? Or were they any you had to cut that you’d want to bring into another one?

Cook:
We definitely wanted to do a yeti and a sasquatch as a tag team. We wanted to do a Royal Rumble with some zombies against some trolls. We had a list, but logistically and practically, some we could not afford to do with our special-effects budget, so the monsters we did select, we wanted to appease fans of the classic monsters and toss in a couple of ones that would kind of mimic wrestling archetypes.

Like, Swamp Gut is the essential obese wrestler, like King Kong Bundy. Witch Bitch, we wanted to have a couple of female wrestlers in there. We had a list of several mythological monsters, but Cyclops is the only one off that list we chose. But yeah, there's a long list of possibilities. And obviously, in a sequel, you could bring monsters back to life. —Rod Lott

Hey! Read This:

Monster Brawl Blu-ray review  


by Rod Lott 06.15.2012 2 years ago
at 08:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

ParaNorman


Youth

None
If you haven’t seen 2009’s Coraline, you might be more inclined to surrender yourself to the macabre charm of ParaNorman. Both films, works of stop-motion animation by the Oregon-based Laika company, share much in common: an outcast protagonist, ineffectual grown-ups, visually stunning riffs on the supernatural.
 
Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Knight watch

Batman soars into Oklahoma City to deliver a little BAM! POW! OOF! in an action-packed, effects-laden stage show.


Performing Arts

Rod Lott
Batman Live
7 p.m. Wednesday-Friday, 11:30 a.m. Saturday, 3:30 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 1 and 5 p.m. Sunday
Chesapeake Energy Arena
100 W. Reno
chesapeakearena.com
800-745-3000
$19.50-$69.50
 
Wednesday, October 10, 2012

Frankenweenie

Tim Burton builds a better 'Frankenweenie' and it’s alive! It’s alive! It’s alive with humor and heart.


Youth

Rod Lott
One imagines Frankenweenie is the movie director Tim Burton has been waiting to make his entire life.
 
Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Appropriate culturation?


CFN

Gazette staff
Oh, boy. Our governor’s daughter is in the news again, and it’s not pretty.
 
Wednesday, March 12, 2014

LETTERS

Music future is bright


John D. Carlson
The first time that I encountered the genius of John Fullbright was via a radio program. The show is produced by the owner of The Blue Door, and it shares its name with the title of Joshua Boydston’s excellent cover story on the artist (“For the sake of the song”; May 7, 2014; Oklahoma Gazette).
 
Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Hayes Carll


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff

There’s not a more appropriate hometown for an artist than The Woodlands, Texas, for Hayes Carll. The 35-year-old singersongwriter’s music is steeped heavily in blues and Americana, yet there’s a certain mystique to his sound that makes it seem like it came from deep within the thickets of the Lone Star State. See Carll 8 p.m. Thursday at the always intimate Blue Door, 2805 N. McKinley Ave. Tickets are $30-$35. Call 524-0738 or visit bluedoorokc.com.

Thursday

 
Tuesday, July 22, 2014
 
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