Tuesday 22 Jul
 
 
 photo BO-Button1_zps13524083.jpg

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: bob dylan

Bob Dylan — In Concert: Brandeis University

A must-have for Dylan collectors


Folk

Rob Collins
A year before The Beatles exploded on “The Ed Sullivan Show,” Bob Dylan planned to perform “Talkin’ John Birch Paranoid Blues” in the spring of 1963 for a national TV audience.
 
Monday, March 28, 2011
TheeBadNewes

NMF: Thee Bad Newes/FRMR

DIY folk goodness and experimental pop madness

Friday's NMF started out with a disappointment: Football, etc. canceled their set because their drummer broke both his feet (what?!?).  Instead, I caught Thee Bad Newes on Opolis' inside stage, where I spent a surprising amount of time throughout the festival. I'm becoming sedentary, and this is proof.

Nevertheless, Thee Bad Newes were fun to watch. I'm all about the DIY attitude and aesthetic, and TBN has both in spades. The duo releases music on cassette tapes (definition) and sings lyrics about working to build a life in community. The acoustic guitar/cello duo's songs were a blend of the gentle and the harsh, as the nylon-stringed acoustic guitar was most often played in a fingerpicking style reminiscent of both The Tallest Man on Earth and Bob Dylan. The cello provided lithe, swooning accompaniment.

Similarly to both aforementioned artists, the vocals were somewhere between a bray and a bark, bringing a raw element to the sound. It was a unique and interesting set, which was sad in light of the comment "This will be our last show for a while."

Rolling on out to Sooner Theater, I caught the back half of FRMR's set, which just about blew my mind and eardrums. The bizarre, carnival-esque tunes that erupt from the many members of FRMR are dizzying in their volume, erratic changes and general chaos. The bass (held down by local staple John Calvin) powered a lot of the tunes, as well as the army of keyboards. The vocals were oddest of all, making me marvel at the fact that some people's musical brains just work so much differently than mine. It was a fascinating set, and I would suggest anyone interested in experimental pop to check out FRMR's variety of it.

by Stephen Carradini 05.05.2011 3 years ago
at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Out of the Vinyl Deeps: Ellen Willis on Rock Music — Nona Willis Aronowitz, ed.

A fascinating republishing of an unfairly forgotten seminal rock critic’s work


Nonfiction

Stephen Carradini
The New Yorker hired Ellen Willis as its first pop music critic in 1968. She wrote the monthly “Rock, Etc.” column for the magazine until 1975.
 
Friday, June 10, 2011

Kern: Go back to the closet

She was kinda asking for it with that book title.


CFN

Gazette staff

When Bob Dylan said they’ll stone you when you’re trying to keep your seat, he may have been talking about state Rep. Sally Kern, R-Oklahoma City.

 
Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hear this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Guitarist Sharon Isbin has a résumé that would make even Bob Dylan jealous.
 
Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Various Artists — The Lost Notebooks of Hank Williams

Thank goodness these songs ‘Saw the Light’ of day.


Country

Matt Carney
As if the man born Hiram King Williams’ influence on country music (and all subsequently affected genres, particularly rock ’n’ roll) wasn’t already completely obvious and seminal, the long-dead crooner had to go and scribble a bunch more terrific songs about heartbreak and loneliness into his diary, just to remind us of his ownership of the subject matter even generations after he died.
 
Thursday, October 13, 2011

Randy melodies

If a song a day keeps the doctor away, Randy Montgomery may be immortal. He’s on his way to 200 consecutive tunes.


Music

Mia Cantu
Folk and blues artist Randy Montgomery started making music when he was 14 years old. As a self-taught guitar player, he would mimic the ways of his musical idols, Bob Dylan and Woody Guthrie.
 
Wednesday, March 21, 2012

All is ’bright

Proclaimed Jimmy Webb, 'John Fullbright will be a household name in American music.' Who are we to argue? America, meet Woody Guthrie’s heir apparent.


Music

Joshua Boydston
John Fullbright
8 p.m. Thursday-Friday
The Blue Door
2805 N. McKinley
bluedoorokc.com
524-0738
$20
 
Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Thinkin’ about Woody

Woody Guthrie’s legacy shines bright in 2012.


Music

Hugh Foley
Editor’s note: With Saturday marking Woody Guthrie’s 100th birthday, we asked music scholar Hugh Foley for his take on why Guthrie still matters. A professor at Rogers State University in Claremore, Foley is the author of the Oklahoma Music Guide II and a founding board member of the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame.
 
Wednesday, July 11, 2012
 
Close
Close
Close