Saturday 19 Apr
 
 
 photo 85cca911-3826-446b-828b-785107dd2ef3_zpse09f07ac.jpg

 

OKG Newsletter


Topic: civic center

Romance this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Pianist Jon Kimura Parker, aka “Concerto Man,” will woo audience members when he performs “Two Aspects of Romanticism” — Schumann and Rachmaninoff, to be exact — with the Oklahoma City Philharmonic on Saturday.
 
Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Magic this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Music and magic join forces for two unbelievable nights with the Oklahoma City Philharmonic and guest conductor Jack Everly.
 
Wednesday, October 26, 2011

‘Buried’ issues

Solid acting about shaky grounds abounds in ‘Buried Child.’


Performing Arts

Larry Laneer
Buried Child
8 p.m. Thursday-Sunday
Oklahoma City Theatre Company
Civic Center Music Hall
201 N. Walker
297-2264
$17-$20
 
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Pop this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Sans Garfunkel, Paul Simon brings his sounds of silence — and other legendary hits — to the Civic Center Music Hall stage, 201 N. Walker.
 
Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Master Folds

Miss Ben Folds’s ACM@UCO master class last night?

Worry not, for OKSee was there taking notes for you.

The quick hits: ACM@UCO head honcho Scott Booker tossed open-ended questions Folds’ way for about an hour, which he spent detailing his start and several of the early business decisions he made. About 500+ sat in rapt attention, cheering and occasionally even gently heckling the two men on stage. Wayne Coyne sat front row, which Folds acknowledged during the interview.

Booker ended his bit, opening the floor to questions from the audience. The line formed long quickly, and OKSee took off for the Ra Ra Riot show a few questions in. However, it was more than enough time to hear some great, enlightening banter from Booker and Folds, particularly the nature and function of the artist within the modern music business. Also, he made a buncha funnies.

I’ve gone through my notes and assembled a highlight reel of sound bites that are below. Enjoy.

On growing up singing in the South, where the stereotype that musically minded boys were all homosexuals:

“My father said I had a terrible voice.”


On breaking his hand while defending his roommate from bullies at the University of Miami, and subsequently flunking a test and losing his music scholarship:

“I threw my drums in the lake.”


On his experience working on a music publishing deal in Nashville:

“I enjoyed it, sort of. I didn’t get any royalty money for three or four years because of the bad contract. ... Ben Folds Five happened because I got so scared of the Nashville thing.”


On the transfer from working on a Nashville hit-making assembly line to his own solo project:

“Suddenly I realized all the things that were getting me rejected were suddenly valued. ... Then I heard Liz Phair’s ‘Exile in Guyville’ ... and that set me off. I knew about The Replacements, but I didn’t really know about indie stuff.”


On the piano he lugged around during those earlier BF5 years:

“I borrowed a lot of money to pay for that first piano. It was in constant danger of getting repossessed.”


On the business end:

“We got a business manager who explained we needed to borrow money to pay taxes.”


On 550 Music’s (a division of Sony Music Entertainment) promotion of the single “Brick”:

“They treated ‘Brick’ like ‘Every Rose Has Its Thorn’: Release two rockers, then a power ballad. And it worked.”


On signing to a major label:

“It was a relief. It meant I didn’t have to move my piano anymore.”


On working as a producer:

“I like being the producer when I’m brining to life something that wouldn’t be music otherwise. The Nick Hornby collaboration, for instance.”


On certain of his works being considered “novelty” or a joke:

“My biggest frustration is the words ‘novelty song.’ I don’t know what that means.”


On Elliott Smith, with whom he toured (and whom Booker briefly managed):

“He’s such a great songwriter technically. He was trying to write Beatles songs, and people heard him for what he was, which was desperate.”


Odds and ends:

“I was writing waltzes about Howard Cosell and stuff.”

“We got a tour manager who’d worked for Slayer.”

“We spent money on a producer; we liked his name, Stiff Johnson.”

“After ‘Brick,’ I started pulling favors. Like, ‘OK, I want to make a spoken-word record with William Shatner.’”

“Rivers [Cuomo, of Weezer] was off on an island somewhere, laying in the sun. I think that’s where he got the song.”

“[‘Weird Al’ Yankovic] is the most not-weird man I’ve ever met.”

“One of my best friends is Bob Saget.”

Folds performs tonight with the OKC Philharmonic at the Civic Center. Tickets are still available at the box office and online at okcciviccenter.com. “The Best Imitation of Myself: A Retrospective” is out now.



by Matt Carney 11.03.2011 2 years ago
at 01:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Hear this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Fireworks and Easter in January? Better believe it, as pianist Louis Lortie joins the Oklahoma City Philharmonic at 8 p.m. Saturday at Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker, for “Commoners and Kings.”
 
Wednesday, January 4, 2012

‘Family’ matters

‘The Addams Family’ comes to town, this time with song and dance in tow. There goes the neighborhood.


Performing Arts

Rod Lott
The Addams Family
7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, through Jan. 22
Civic Center Music Hall
201 N. Walker
okcciviccenter.com
297-2264
$20-$65
 
Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Experience this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Canterbury Choral Society aims to jolt the senses with Experiences with Sound, a unique production that combines the music of Beethoven and Brahms with the choir’s 145 voices, synchronized lights and multimedia stimulation.
 
Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Great times for OKC


Letters to the Editor

Sandy Meyers
To live in Oklahoma City today is exciting. The approval by the Oklahoma City Council to restructure Centennial Plaza or Civic Center park is a great gift to all of us. Making this prominent property a spectacular centerpiece for the arts and civic affairs gives us all a feeling of pride and excitement.
 
Wednesday, March 21, 2012

String this


OKG7 things to do

Gazette staff
Craving some Brahms? Violinist David Kim and cellist Carter Brey deliver a double concerto of the renowned composer as part of the Oklahoma City Philharmonic’s Sumptuous Strings. Set for 8 p.m. Saturday at Civic Center Music Hall, 201 N. Walker, the concert also features works by Satie, Debussy, Tchaikovsky and Dohnanyl. Arrive an hour early for a concert preview. Tickets are $15-$65. Call 842-5387 or visit okcphilharmonic.org.

Saturday

 
Wednesday, March 28, 2012
 
Close
Close
Close