Monday 28 Jul
 
 
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OKG Newsletter


Topic: dance

Masterful moves

OKC Ballet stages four works, including two world premieres, in its ‘Masters and Moderns’ showcase


Performing Arts

Eric Webb
Masters and Moderns
8 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday
Civic Center Music Hall
201 N. Walker 848-8637
www.okcballet.com
$29-$54
 
Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Dancing king

Since Nick Felix owns Dance Magic Studios, it became the ideal setting for his directorial debut, ‘Never Too Late,’ shot in the metro.


Features

Courtney Silva
If there’s anyone whose motto should be “if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again,” it would be Nick Felix. The dance instructor and owner of Dance Magic Studios, 7312 Cherokee Plaza, has experienced as many successes as he has failures, but never seems to be deterred.
 
Wednesday, March 16, 2011

PR BS

Yoko Ono, potholes and trout


CFN

Gazette staff
Lots of press releases cross our desk. Recently, these titles least screamed “Stop the presses!”
 
Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Do you do you do you do you wan-na dance?

With free, new tracks from The Rapture and M83, you oughta be set

While this speculation remains unconfirmed, the New York dance band’s sure to sell a bunch of albums this fall. Their fourth LP, “In the Grace of Your Love,” hits stores in September, courtesy of DFA Records.

The nearly 7-minute melodramatic disco banger “How Deep Is Your Love” is the album’s first single, and if it’s any indicator, “Grace” is going to absolutely slay the competition for album of the year.

Here’s why: The Rapture previously operated as a pretty stripped-down, manic, dance-punk band (see: 2003’s excellent “Echoes”) but “Deep” exhibits some aggressive sonic expansion. Included is a more earnest and theatrical lyrical arrangement as well as more nuanced use of keys and synths, where those were mostly used as solo instruments on previous Rapture records.

Somewhere, Justin Vernon’s beard trembles.

Anywho, M83 is another electro band slated for an ambitious fall release (a double-LP, in fact) that just so happens to have put out a terrific single to hype it.

Midnight City” starts off sounding the way MGMT did on their first record — dancey and psychedelic on an epic scale. I’ve got a feeling that the French electro-poppers will be highly sought-after on next summer’s festival schedule.—Matt Carney


by Matt Carney 07.21.2011 3 years ago
at 01:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Dance this


Gazette staff
Prepare for dancers to scale the sky at the fifth annual Oklahoma Contemporary Dance Festival.
 
Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Limitless movement

A dance class teaches technique to blind students of all ages.


Features

Heide Brandes
In Tanya Chianese’s youth ballet class, students listen more than watch. She describes movements using imagery, using words instead of steps to show her class where a foot is placed, how high a chin is lifted or how low a plié should be.
 
Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Shimmy show

A nationally renowned dance troupe utilizes local belly dancers for more intimate performances.


Features

Charles Martin
Club Bellydance
7:30 p.m. Friday
Edmond Community Center
28 E. Main, Edmond
$20-$25
 
Wednesday, October 19, 2011

VOTD: Move over, Daft Punk

Help the world welcome the new Justice album with a pair of prog-tastic music vids.

There’s no denying the resounding influence of 1970s prog rock on Parisian electro-heads Justice (whom many have called the heirs to Daft Punk’s giant pyramid throne) and their much-anticipated second record, “Audio Video Disco,” which was released yesterday. 

The two videos below do well to match the enormity of these new tracks, particularly “Civilization,” which literally has glowing, stampeding space buffalo trying to dodge falling boulders as the world falls apart. Glad to know that somebody other than Kanye West wants to bring back what bands like Yes and King Crimson loved about music.

Watch:



by Matt Carney 10.25.2011 2 years ago
at 08:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

OKS Chatter: Reptar

Oddball five-piece Reptar rawrs its way into your heart.

At an early day set at this year’s Austin City Limits Music Festival, I caught the Athens, Ga.-based Reptar hosting a big party at one of the smaller stages, plopping synth melodies and jumping around onstage while encouraging the audience — that really didn’t need the prompting — to join them.

I later caught up with synth player Ryan Engleberger and multi-instrumentalist Graham Ulicny to talk about the band’s hometown, extroversion and why its debut EP is named “Oblange Fizz Y’all.”

OKSee: What’s the music scene in Athens like right now?

Engleberger: Athens is really interesting, because there’s this constant tension between people like Graham and I, who are townies who moved there because there’s a lot to offer that isn’t related to the University of Georgia. Then there’s the U of Georgia side that’s Andrew and William. We actually represent a pretty good merger of townies and school kids.

Sometimes people who write for publications take sides and create divisions when there aren’t really any. But we all play with each other. It’s hard not to be influenced by one side, if you’re the other.

OKS: What’s each side specifically known for?

Engleberger: I think the stereotype is that the townies are a little weirder. Then the UGA side is frattier.



OKS: Explain the title of your EP. Because I don’t know how to pronounce or what the hell it means.

Engleberger: The title is actually a combination of a couple of ancient, now-defunct languages. And also English. You can find “fizz” in the Oxford English Dictionary. To fizz. To have fizzed. Having been fizzed.

Graham Ulicny: Desperately want to fizz. To fizz oblangley.

Engleberger: Right. “Oblangle” is a combination of words from ancient languages. There’s a symbol from a Mayan word, a Latin word and not Czech, but a precursor to Czech. There’s a combination of that, the deep linguistic studies we all do. I think mostly, it’s just from the sonic, train-of-thought conversations we have that don’t always make sense, but have to do with us making sounds and reciting things that we maybe have half-learned before. It just kinda came up.

OKS: Did you guys study linguistics in school?

Engleberger: I totally made that up. I studied Latin for a bit, I guess.

OKS: Why do you guys go full steam ahead into synthesizer-driven melodies?

Engleberger: I think the melody-heavy part is because of pop songs. Pop songs are all about melody. We wanted experimental elements, but mostly we want to record songs that people will listen to and enjoy, you know? We want to mess with them and take them out of their comfort zone, but in order for them to get into it, there has to be a good melody. Graham studied jazz, and it’s all about melody. A lot of really complicated stuff spins out of that, but that’s the basis.

Ulicny: It’s about a communal experience. There’s a lot of ways to enjoy music in a crowd, but we’re always looking to encourage people to be extroverted. And the best way to do that is to have something relatable, like a melody. And energy onstage.

OKS: And you guys are nothing if not extroverted, onstage.

Engleberger: We try.



Photo by Matt Carney
by Matt Carney 11.09.2011 2 years ago
at 12:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
 

Just dance

From stick figures to muffin tops, anybody can move to the beat toward a better bod.


Features

Jenn Scott
I’m sure you’ve been there: center stage.
 
Wednesday, December 7, 2011
 
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